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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

trailer break: ‘The House Bunny’

Take a break from work: watch a movie trailer…

Dumb as a mentally deficient brick is the new pink!

The House Bunny opens wide on August 22.

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  • Accounting Ninja

    You know, if I were a Bunny, I’d be pretty insulted. The tv trailer says “she’ll go where no Bunny has gone before: college!”

    I’m sure some have gone to college. I mean, you don’t even really have to be very smart to go to college nowadays anyways.

    I really, really want to snark at her, but she did make me giggle. I like seeing women pull off physical comedy. Plus, even though she teaches all the Nerd Gurls to be, like, Hawt, I’m sure that, in the end, they’ll be the ones who teach her the Importance of Being Yourself, dagnabbit.

  • the rook

    you gotta admit, this picture is going to deliver what it promises. admittedly it’s not promising very much, but if you’re looking for a former playboy bunny to act vapid in a university environment, well this picture is going to deliver.

  • JoshB

    Well, obviously no Bunny has ever been to college, because sexiness and intelligence are genetically mutually exclusive. Especially in women. And audiences think it’s hilarious to be reminded of that.

    So clearly the only recourse for those poor smart girls is to remake their identities at the prompting of someone who doesn’t know what a breathalyzer is. Ha. Ha ha. She fellated a cop because she thought he ordered her to. It’s funny.

  • All right, I am gonna own up to it: This trailer makes me laugh my ass off.

    Doubt I’ll subject myself to the theater throngs for this, though, when that Wal-mart Grocery $1 rental machine is so damn convenient.

  • MBI

    I don’t often get offended on behalf of other people, but women everywhere, you have my sympathies after seeing this trailer.

  • MBI

    For what it’s worth, I don’t think stupidity is a prerequisite, or even the norm, to be a Bunny. Of course, that’s based on this one girl I knew from college who’s now an award-winning porn star. Apparently, all you need is very deep-seated self-esteem issues (again, extrapolating from the one porn actress I know).

  • The House Bunny…now 100% humour-free!

    That was the worst thing I’ve ever seen. Ever. It’s worse than Princess Aurora. It’s more misogynist than Grey’s Anatomy.

    Well okay, it’s not that bad. Perhaps the most womyn-hating comedy not involving Judd Apatow ever?

    Wait…this tripe was written by two wymyn? How is it that we men have been so successful in oppressing wymyn that the most misogynist works in film and television are created by wymyn themselves? It’s enough to make me seek out an exorcist to remove my Y chromosome.

  • wilsonhl

    Did anyone mention that it was directed by Fred Wolf, the same guy who brought us some eternal classics like Without A Paddle and Strange Wilderness (MaryAnn, you thought Pineapple Express was bad? Check this one). Not a good sign.

    I can’t judge the movie based on the trailer, but maybe it’s trying to be the arrested development comedy for women (Then, why not call it Forgetting Hugh Hefner?)

  • Ryan

    They could just call it Legally Blonde 3, we get the idea. It’s too bad Anna Faris seems incapable of picking a decent movie, she seems like a fairly capable actress.

  • MaryAnn

    How is it that we men have been so successful in oppressing wymyn that the most misogynist works in film and television are created by wymyn themselves?

    It could have something to do with the fact that it’s men who run the studios, and they think they’re doing so for an audience of males.

    In other words: Even the house slave was still a slave.

  • It’s too bad Anna Faris seems incapable of picking a decent movie, she seems like a fairly capable actress.

    Well, she’s certainly got playing a ditz down to a fine art. Even in Lost in Translation she played a ditz.

  • Mimi

    God help me, “Eyes are the nipples of the face!” made me laugh.

    I’m not proud.

  • wilsonhl

    God help me, “Eyes are the nipples of the face!” made me laugh.

    But it sounds oddly close to a one-liner of “The Office”. As Dwight Schrute explained early in the fourth season : “The eyes are the groin of the head.”

  • Jurgan

    “wymyn”

    Oh, don’t do that. Misspelling is not making a progressive statement- it just makes you look stupid and deluded.

  • Anne-Kari

    I’ll never get back the that 1 minute and 57 seconds of my life.

    Eeeeeuuuuuchh.

  • MBI

    “It could have something to do with the fact that it’s men who run the studios, and they think they’re doing so for an audience of males.

    In other words: Even the house slave was still a slave.”

    I’ve got an addition to that answer, based on an article I read interviewing the two writers.

    It’s also because those two women are morons.

  • MaryAnn

    Are they morons, though? The film is getting good reviews and will likely do well at the box office. So maybe it’s our whole culture that is moronic.

  • Hasimir Fenring

    Oh, don’t do that. Misspelling is not making a progressive statement- it just makes you look stupid and deluded.

    It’s an alternative spelling, not a misspelling. I’m not interested in how it ‘makes [me] look’ to you, nor is it intended as a ‘progressive statement’. Perhaps before you break out the grade-school insults, you might ask me why I choose the spelling.

    Nah. Who needs respectful communication when there’s ignorant mockery to be handed out?

  • Accounting Ninja

    They aren’t morons. They are laughing all the way to the bank.

    It also may have something to do with the trend nowadays that young women think feminism is a dirty word and empowerment means being an over-sexualized ditz so as not to scare away the men. A lot of women really believe this is the road to female power.

    This is surprising! I thought that the movie would follow the old formula: slutty, dumb but ultimately sweet Bunny teaches “nerds” (who are really perfectly hot girls with thick glasses and messy hair and Hollywood-approved “quirks”) to slut themselves out. But the girls aren’t Being Themselves, so drama ensues, (possibly involving the sweet, nerdy guy who was secretely in love with the head nerd girl) the the Bunny’s character Learns and Grows. At the end, Bunny realizes that there’s nothing wrong with Being Different.

    But this sounds very bad…yikes.

  • MaryAnn

    It’s an alternative spelling, not a misspelling. I’m not interested in how it ‘makes [me] look’ to you, nor is it intended as a ‘progressive statement’. Perhaps before you break out the grade-school insults, you might ask me why I choose the spelling.

    Okay, Hasimir: Why don’t you explain to us your purpose in appropriating an “alternative spelling” that was explicitly created as a feminist statement (by excluding “men”)?

    Could it be that you meant to impugn feminism on the whole by using this alternative spelling as a snide insult, as this comment of yours appears to suggest:

    Wait…this tripe was written by two wymyn? How is it that we men have been so successful in oppressing wymyn that the most misogynist works in film and television are created by wymyn themselves? It’s enough to make me seek out an exorcist to remove my Y chromosome.

    If I’m wrong, perhaps you would be so kind as to explain in what spirit this comment was intended.

  • Jurgan

    I think using “wymyn” is a pretty stupid thing for a woman or a man to do. It actually kind of scares me.

    “that was explicitly created as a feminist statement (by excluding ‘men’)?”

    That’s the point. Last I checked, feminism was about equality among genders. By “excluding” men, the impression I get is that “wymyn” want to have no interactions with men at all. The only other time I’ve seen this misspelling used was by women who literally hated all men and wanted to create some sort of a separate society where there were no men. At risk of sounding presumptuous, separatism and misandry should not be the goal of feminism.

    Now, maybe some people mean it in a different way, but I don’t see how this “alternate spelling” is making any sort of a meaningful statement.

  • MaryAnn

    The only other time I’ve seen this misspelling used was by women who literally hated all men and wanted to create some sort of a separate society where there were no men.

    I think that’s a bit extreme, Jurgan, but I agree that there seems to be little real point in using this “alternate spelling” — which is also something of a misnomer. “Humor” and “humour” are “alternate spellings”; “wymyn” does not enjoy anywhere near such a level of acceptability.

    But this is about what Hasimir meant. He insists there are usages of this spelling that are not about making a “progressive statement.” I mean, it’s true that there seems to be little genuinely progressive about the word, but it’s only used in certain circles that believe themselves to be progressive and even radical. I’m curious as to what other senses Hasimir thinks it has or has seen it used in.

  • Hasimir Fenring

    …also something of a misnomer. “Humor” and “humour” are “alternate spellings”; “wymyn” does not enjoy anywhere near such a level of acceptability.

    In that case, what should we call it? I don’t see it as a ‘misspelling’ because I intentionally spelled it that way, and it isn’t a neologism. What level of acceptance would a given spelling need to reach to be considered ‘alternate’?

    Okay, Hasimir: Why don’t you explain to us your purpose in appropriating an “alternative spelling” that was explicitly created as a feminist statement (by excluding “men”)?

    When I was an active opponent of feminism, I used that spelling to mock it. Now that I am a feminist (albeit yet a neophyte), I continue to use the word as a sort of jab at my old self. In a sense, I’m repudiating my previous mockery by using the term seriously. You may think I’m inviting misunderstanding by doing this, and you may be right, but I’ve been using it on this site and many others for years, and this is the first time someone has told me I look stupid for so doing, or even mentioned it at all. If it’s really so identified with its creators that its use in any context is apt to cause this sort of confusion, then perhaps I’d do better not to use it. But I don’t see it as progressive or radical but simply a better way to spell the word (and a way to have some fun at my old self’s expense), and as I said, this is the first time anyone’s associated me with either faux-progressivism or snide mockery of feminism for using it.

    If I’m wrong, perhaps you would be so kind as to explain in what spirit this comment was intended.

    I think I explained what I meant here in my comment on your review of the film. You’ll note that comment was posted on the 24th and so was not in response to what you’ve said here. So no, it was not at all intended to impugn feminism. I am appalled at the possibility that we men have been so successful in objectifying women that many women have themselves internalised these views, as Sara noted.

    If the comment you quoted were intended to impugn feminism, it would be a complete failure since it is to my mind a reasonable (if not necessarily correct) view of modern filmmaking. If you think it’s incorrect, great! (I want it to be incorrect since I find it horrifying.) But is it so outlandish that I could only have meant it as a sly attack on feminism? I shouldn’t have thought so.

  • Ryan

    “When I was an active opponent of feminism, I used that spelling to mock it. Now that I am a feminist (albeit yet a neophyte), I continue to use the word as a sort of jab at my old self. In a sense, I’m repudiating my previous mockery by using the term seriously.”

    forgive my cynicism when I say that this is the biggest pile of BS I have ever read.

  • MaSch

    To say that women adopted these views about gender relations is a bit one-sided; here we have an example of women giving out the message to (including) young men.
    Not only men are busy reinforcing gender stereotypes, there are women who do that too, and are as much or little forced to do so as the corresponding men are.

    Wait, this discussion takes place under a trailer for “The House Bunny”? Weird world …

  • JoshB

    forgive my cynicism when I say that this is the biggest pile of BS I have ever read.

    How do you figure? If he says that’s his motivation then why would you doubt him?

    Forgive me when I say that you can’t go around calling people liars without explaining your reasoning.

  • MaryAnn

    I figure Hasimir is being genuine when he explains his motivation, but I think he’s mistaken about how it is perceived. He said:

    I don’t see it as progressive or radical but simply a better way to spell the word

    Except the word doesn’t need to be spelled in a “better way” unless one believes that “man” and “men” should have no part of what women get up to.

    (and a way to have some fun at my old self’s expense)

    That may work at Hasimir’s own blog, but it’s problematic when used in a situation where the readers may not have read his other writings.

    this is the first time anyone’s associated me with either faux-progressivism or snide mockery of feminism for using it.

    Because the spelling is used, generally, in all seriousness only by those with rather extreme radical philosophies, it’s not unreasonable to expect that most readers will read it as either a genuine embracing of such radicalism or as a mocking of such. In the context of your comment, Hasimir, which appears to mock this film, that seems to be the only way to read it: as mocking. Sorry.

  • Hasimir Fenring

    Except the word doesn’t need to be spelled in a “better way” unless one believes that “man” and “men” should have no part of what women get up to

    I meant in relation to its pronunciation, but then, why stop there? I might as well support phonetic spelling for all English words. Since I don’t, it’s special pleading for me to do it in this case.

    but it’s problematic when used in a situation where the readers may not have read his other writings.

    Point taken.

    it’s not unreasonable to expect that most readers will read it as either a genuine embracing of such radicalism or as a mocking of such.

    I see. I don’t think I realised just how radical it is, and so I was effectively using it to mean precisely what I wanted it to mean rather than, you know, what it actually means. I stand corrected.

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