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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

Paul Newman, 1925–2008

I heard about Paul Newman’s death tonight from the front page of a newspaper in a gas station in Stratford-upon-Avon, which means it must have been announced yesterday.

Feel free to chat here about favorite Newman roles and other public works (spaghetti sauce, charitable works, etc.).



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  • What can one say? This was not a surprise death but it was a sad one because of the nature of the person we have lost. Mr. Newman set wonderful examples in the world of acting, marriage, philanthropy and activism. He will be missed in every area of his life. That says a lot.

  • Kathy A

    When I was seven years old, I saw my first film that wasn’t a kids flick or a family film–The Sting. I instantly developed a lifelong love for (1) con men movies; (2) period films; (3) Robert Redford; and (4) Paul Newman.

    The Sting remains my favorite of his films, but there are so many others that were equally brilliant–Slap Shot, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke, and one that I liked from very late in his career, Road to Perdition.

    He will be missed, and my heart goes out to Joanne. They had one of the great Hollywood real-life romances.

  • Behind his wonderful blue eyes, Paul let us all see his brain, his passion, his love for a profession that often is just entertainment, but that could and should be also compelling and inspiring for many people.

    I´d like to remember him for his performances with Robert Redford, both in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid and in The Sting, and for his late role as the drunken lawyer of The Verdict, directed by the great Sidney Lumet.

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