Quantcast
subscriber help

artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

ding dong, the witch is dead

which old witch?

the wicked witch

ding dong, the wicked witch is dead



Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/flick/public_html/wptest/wp-content/themes/FlickFilosopher/loop-single.php on line 106
posted in:
easter eggs
explore:
  • Patrick

    “We welcome you to Obama land!”

    *does happy dance*

  • JoshB

    This is so beautiful. I can’t stop smiling. But I felt pretty stupid trying to hold back tears during his victory speech.

  • Drave

    Don’t feel stupid, JoshB. I started crying the second John Stewart read the official total that put Obama over the top. After eight years of darkness, we can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel. I have never been more proud of my country.

  • JSW

    Yub yub, America. Yub frickin’ yub!

    I need to line myself up some Stormtrooper helmets and get some drumsticks.

  • Cue the prognosticators of our imminent Marxist demise.

    As for me, I would love to see the politics of hatred and fear where they belong: dead and buried. Tonight was a good start (although with the gay marriage bans carrying everywhere, the victory is somewhat bittersweet).

  • misterb

    Those of us who supported Barack and all he stands for really have to help shoulder the burden. W’s inept policies exposed the error of conservative thought; we can’t let that happen to progressive ideas. But times are tough, we’ll all have to sacrifice something, but it couldn’t be more important for all of our futures that America makes our greatest stand now, not later.

  • TheGaucho

    To all Americans: congratulations. You have elected the right man.

  • SoniaDee

    Oh JoshB, don’t feel stupid! I had tears down my face during that speech. How great to listen to our future president speak and feel inspired & proud!

  • Anne-Kari

    Nightmares, all night long, because I was too exhausted yesterday to stay up for the results. When I went to bed, it was looking about 50/50.

    All night I had nightmares about waking up to a McCain win. Real, honest-to-goodness nightmares, complete with polling results and an announcement on CNN and a concession speach from Obama.

    I woke up at 5am, dragged myself over to the computer and checked the results.

    Oh Happy Day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • amanohyo

    Bongwater, I think a gradual capitalist demise is more likely, but it is definitely a happy day today. As usual, a Simpsons moment sums up my feelings best.

    Wow, Obama is the president elect. I feel so full of…what’s the opposite of shame?

    Pride?

    No, not that far from shame.

    Less shame?

    Yeah…

  • D

    I understand that Barack is not a miracle worker who will make everything alright. The world is still facing many difficult problems with no easy solution in sight. And we may even became a little disapointed with Obama on the long run. With that said…

    OH, HAPPY DAY!!! (OH, HAPPY DAY!!)
    OH HAPPY DAY!!!

    I AM SO, SO HAPPY!!! I’m 18, so I am to young to remember what’s like not to feel fear and dislike for a current USA president. This is all new to me, not to mention the world, of course. I thank you, THANK YOU, americans, so very, very much for electing someone who doesn’t make me fear for the future of the world. In case you haven’t noticed, pretty much the rest of the world supports your decision. speceally Kenya, whose government declared that tomorrow should be a national holiday.

    Adeus, Bushie. Ninguém vai sentir saudades.

  • D

    Now if you excuse me, I’m going to put my Obama t-shirt on.

  • MaryAnn

    I bawled through Obama’s speech. Mostly cuz I was thinking, “Don’t be bullshitting us. Be as amazing as you’re promising us right now you’re gonna be.”

    I was ready to be furious at a McCain win. I was not expecting to feel such relief at an Obama win.

  • AJP

    I doubt Obama will be nearly as amazing as his rhetoric. And that will turn out to be a huge problem for him, as the backlash will be nasty when people realize that he is just another standard-issue politician. Quite simply, expectations are simply too high for him (or anyone) to be able to live up to them.

    I expect that sometime in March or so, Obama will break a lot of hearts by explaining how it is not possible to pull out of Iraq any time soon, and that he is simply going to continue the bailout plan started by the current administration, and while he can get implemented a lot of things that won’t impact the budget (but will probably shock some people who haven’t been paying attention, like FOCA and card check), anything that costs money, including his promised tax cut, will have to be tabled indefinitely.

    Essentially, what we will see is the inevitable collision between idealistic hope and crushing reality. And it won’t be pretty.

  • Nathan

    Hell, just the fact that Obama can speak in complete sentences is a huge step up for us right now.

    I doubt many people voted for Obama thinking that he will change everything for the better overnight. He is a politician, and he inherits a government that has loose rein at best on a corporate military-industrial complex that drags us along behind it at times; but he is not a standard-issue politician, and I think he understands that the best that a person in his position can do is to try to alter the course of the beast as much as possible even as his own ideals are compromised. After the last eight years, that is more than enough for me.

    Not to mention the nation living up to its potential of being a true meritocracy and a revolution in how we (and to some extent the world) view ourselves. If you didn’t feel the earth move last night, you are on the wrong side of history.

  • AJP

    The problem with saying that Obama isn’t a standard issue politician is that his record doesn’t show him to be anything other than that. His rhetoric is soaring and inspirational, but his actual actions are simply those of a party-line Democrat. The reality doesn’t match the rhetoric.

    I think many people actually do think Obama is going to be able to implement huge changes – many of his supporters were first time voters inspired by his mantra of sweeping change. I think they will be sadly disillusioned in the next few months. Those who have been involved in politics for a while know he won’t be able to do most (if any) of the things he promised, but those who just got involved are in for a huge reality check.

    The problem for Obama is going to stem from your last two sentences: they are full of hope and optimism for a change that he will probably be completely unable to deliver. I remember people were all excited about how Clinton was going to transform America, and almost all of his big ideas he got chewed up, spit out, and discarded. Carter came into office on the tail end of a Republican presidential era tainted by Watergate, and the sunny optimism of his presidency turned into a disaster that resulted in him being a one-termer. I think the same will happen for Obama. Whether he can survive the first year blues that have destroyed the hope of so many presidents is a very open question.

  • Jurgan

    The thing about Obama, and the reason I think he is different than a standard politician, is that, in the end, it’s not about him: it’s about us. I honestly think he’s sometimes embarassed by how much focus is on him personally. I think he’s more comfortable as the leader of a team than as the persona he’s become. His win over Mccain, and, even moreso, his win over Hillary Clinton, was made possible in large part due to his skills at organizing his team. And we’re all on the team. There’s a lot of inertia in Washington that will resist change, but this win gives a mandate the likes of which Bill Clinton never had. But it’s up to all of us to make it happen. The work doesn’t end with the election. We have to stay on top of this, and make sure that Obama fulfills our hopes and dreams. We can’t simply sit back and wait for him to fix it for us- we have to stay involved in the movement. Obama won’t be able to overcome all the obstacles he faces alone, but with millions of people organized and fighting to make it work, we can really pull it off. The work’s not done- it’s only just begun.

  • AJP

    And Jurgan’s post just demonstrates my point.

    There really won’t be a change, because many of the people who voted for Obama probably *will* sit back and hope he works wonders. And even if they didn’t, many of the promises Obama made with his inspirational speeches are nigh-undeliverable.

    Governing is a dirty messy business. Evey idealist who has entered the Oval Office has discovered this quickly, and I can’t think of one who has come out unscathed by the experience.

  • MBI

    “Every idealist who has entered the Oval Office has discovered this quickly, and I can’t think of one who has come out unscathed by the experience.”

    And yet some of us are not so sick with cynicism that we believe change is impossible either. There are the Carters and Clintons of history but there are also the reforms of FDRs, JFKs, and even the civil rights reforms of LBJ (and depending on your perspective, the Republican Revolution of Reagan). Idealism does matter. Most conservatives will tell you that part of Reagan’s enduring appeal is that after the disgrace of Nixon and the failures of Carter, Reagan gave off the aura that maybe you didn’t have to feel that it sucked to be an American. And that’s not the same thing as sweeping policy changes but it does matter quite a bit more than you give it credit for.

    For the past seven years, it has sucked to be an American. I’m not looking for a savior, I just want to stop the sucking. Obama can be a twentieth as good as people want him to be and he’ll still turn this country around.

  • AJP

    Yes, some idealists were able to avoid seeing their presidencies turn into disasters, but even they had huge problems: FDR’s economic policies did little to make the Depression better, and may have made it worse (the country, and the world, didn’t begin to really recover until WWII, and the economic picture during D+FDRs first term just got worse and worse). Without his running for a third term and WWII, FDR would probably be seen today as a failure. I don’t think anyone wants Obama’s reputation to need to be saved by a world war.

    JFK had big problems too. we remember the Cuban Missile Crisis now, but the Bay of Pigs came first, and it was a disaster for his administration. He also had the “advantage” of dying in office, so he never had to face the consequences of getting the U.S. involved in Vietnam (LBJ had to suffer that).

    LBJ was never really an idealist – he was a brutal pragmatist who is rightly remembered for passing some significant legislation, but some of that (like the Great Society handouts) are now causing huge problems for the budget. He also isn’t remembered all that fondly: the mismanagment of the Vietnam conflict is a huge stain on his record.

    If Obama has an administration with a track record like those of FDR, JFK, and LBJ, I look for bitter recriminations and a sense of betrayal from the populace by the middle of 2009.

  • Jurgan

    I don’t know, AJP, it sounds like what you’re saying is “Obama’s not going to be perfect, so it’s unrealistic to expect him to do anything positive.” Can we stipulate that he almost certainly won’t accomplish everything he wants to, yet still have hope that we’ll see significant improvements in this country?

  • AJP

    The problem isn’t going to be that Obama isn’t perfect – the problem is going to be that expectations have been set so high for him (mostly by his own campaign) that any kind of result that reailty will allow for will be seen by many as a disappointment.

    I also don’t think the Obama we have heard talking during the campaign matches up very well with Obama’s actual actions when in office. For example, to get into office in the first place, he used some fairly dirty tricks to get all of his opponents thrown off the ballot – normal for Chicago politics, but still pretty nasty, and not the bipartisan healer that he claims to be.

    There is no evidence that Obama has any ideas other than those that are the Democratic party line (every policy he has endorsed or voted for has been standard Democratic party stuff) – there is no evidence that Obama has any kind of skill at forming a bipartisan initiative (try to name one). There is no evidence that Obama has ever bucked his own party.

    I think to a certain extent he will try to implement those policies that he can without raising expenses (things like FOCA and card check for example), but that many people will be shocked by them, since they didn’t pay attention to those piddly little details. I think he will have to scale back his economic proposals to almost nothing, which will infuriate a lot of people who voted for him on the basis that he could fix things (again, I wonder on what basis people came to that conclusion, his response to the current crisis was to remain inert, his history is one of opposing policies like regulating Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac).

    I think that the problem for Obama will be that the gulf between the rhetoric and the payoff will be so huge that it will haunt him for much of his presidency. If he had run on a Chester A. Arthur type platform, then he would have no troubles. But he didn’t, and that will be a problem for him.

  • JoshB

    You’re taking a narrow view, AJP. Obama will probably have to axe (or at least put on the backburner) some of his expensive proposals (public health care). But a lot of the stuff he promised I think he will be able to deliver on. He’ll have a better energy policy (couldn’t get much worse), a more pragmatic foreign policy, and he won’t be so inclined to tap dance on the Constitution. These are all highly worthwhile things.

  • MBI

    “the problem is going to be that expectations have been set so high for him (mostly by his own campaign) that any kind of result that reailty will allow for will be seen by many as a disappointment.”

    You know what, I don’t believe that’s true at all. From what I’ve seen, people are endlessly forgiving of the politicians they like, and people are already steeling themselves for reality with a lot of talk about “the numerous challenges Obama faces” and yadda yadda (i.e. they’re not done piling on the Republicans). If Obama gives us something that’s not an outright failure when he eventually leaves office, I have to imagine his huge fanbase will remain largely intact.

  • Paul

    APJ – If McCain was elected, I’d sound just like you complaining about McCain. McCain’s rep as a maverick was vastly overrated; during the national campaign he agreed with Bush on almost every issue of importance.

    Since Obama is a Democrat, I expect him to be a Democrat, and that’s fine with me. No, he won’t be able to keep all his promises. Reagan only kept 50%, Nixon 55%, and Clinton 60%, and they didn’t have all the problems Bush left Obama.

    But what would be worse than Obama not keeping all his promises is McCain keeping his.

  • “I was ready to be furious at a McCain win. I was not expecting to feel such relief at an Obama win.”

    Oh yeah!

  • TheGaucho

    Living in the Netherlands, and having been liberated from the nazis by American troops on May 5, 1945, and having seen those ancient newsreels time and again, I couldn’t help but see the same emotions in the US on tuesday night. That is what it looked like: liberation from a terrible agressor. I have said it before on this very same page and I will say it again: congratulations, USA, you have elected the right man.

  • Living in the Netherlands, and having been liberated from the nazis by American troops on May 5, 1945, and having seen those ancient newsreels time and again, I couldn’t help but see the same emotions in the US on tuesday night. That is what it looked like: liberation from a terrible agressor. I have said it before on this very same page and I will say it again: congratulations, USA, you have elected the right man.

    Oh, brother.

    * Rolls eyes. *

    I’m happy Obama won. Hell, even my best friend–who voted for another candidate–was happy–for my sake, at least–Obama won.

    But can we please put a stop to the over-the-top rhetoric comparing the Bush Adminstration to a dictatorship? I’m no fan of his policies but when after hearing stories about what one of my former girlfriends had to put up in her native Mexico and what what another former girlfriend’s relatives had to put up in Soviet-occupied Latvia and what some of my maternal relatives had to put up with in Communist Poland, I find all this hyperbole about how bad America has been to be just a bit much.

    I’m happy you approve of Obama, The Gaucho, but enough of the backhanded compliments. There are a lot of people throughout the world who have had worse problems than Americans had during the last eight years. And not all of those problems were caused by Yankees.

    I don’t mean to sound trollish but there’s undoubtedly a lot of people in Georgia and the Sudan who would love to have our problems right now. Let’s show a little respect for those good people who are not as fortunate as we are.

    As for the Obama critics, let’s wait till the guy has had an actual chance to start doing anything before we criticize him. He just got elected. A lot of people didn’t expect him to get this far.

    So let’s cross fingers and see what happens. History has an annoying tendency to not always happen the way we expect it to. So for all we know, Obama could surprise us.

    We’ll see.

  • TheGaucho

    *Rolls eyes*

    Tonio Kruger, I never said that Bush is an evil dictator. I just said that the emotions I saw in the streets of the USA last tuesday looked like the emotions on those old newsreels from our liberation.

    I know that people in the USA are doing a lot better than the people in Eastern Congo, say. I know that it is still fairly comfortable to live in the USA compared to Peru, for example.

    And I agree with you: Obama is elected, he hasn’t done anything yet and we’ll have to wait and see. It is not the second coming or anything.

  • AJP

    “You know what, I don’t believe that’s true at all. From what I’ve seen, people are endlessly forgiving of the politicians they like, and people are already steeling themselves for reality with a lot of talk about “the numerous challenges Obama faces” and yadda yadda (i.e. they’re not done piling on the Republicans). If Obama gives us something that’s not an outright failure when he eventually leaves office, I have to imagine his huge fanbase will remain largely intact.”

    Yes, the endlessly forgiving people that turned on LBJ because the Vietnam War was going badly – he went from a landslide victory to not even seeking renomination within a single term, becoming “lying Johnson” in very short time.

    The same endlessly forgiving people that turned on Carter within a few years of coming into office as the anti-Nixon, mostly because the economy was still tanking (and the downturn started under Nixon, remember that Dick imposed wage and price controls to try to fix it).

    The same endlessly forgiving people that turned on Bush 41 just months after his approval ratings were sky high following Desert Storm because he reneged on his “no new taxes” pledge.

    The same endlessly forgiving people who flipped Congress to Republican control for the first time in decades after the first two year of Clinton – probably driven by Clinton’s failure to actually do anything he said he would: no health care plan, no VAT, no energy tax, no middle class tax cut.

    I give Obama six months at the outside before the sniping begins. The middle class tax cut he promised will be dropped (he couldn’t cut taxes for 95% of Americans anyway, about one-third of Americans pay no income tax at all). Obama’s forgien policy will probably be driven by geopolitical reality to mimic Bush’s (remember when Bush said he didn’t want n ation building and thought engaging North Korea was a bad idea, reality forced him to change; Obama will be forced to change too). Obama’s energy policy will fall apart, since it is hopelessly optimistic, and requires Americans to make sacrifices that will be massively unpopular (his stance on things like clean coal is going to change too, and probably quickly). Obama will hold on to the powers claimed by the Clinton and Bush administrations, the only real change you will likely see is at Guantanamo (which both candidates said they would close), and then you have the question of what happens to the internees after it is closed. I doubt he will free them, they will be moved to some other place – probably where they can get habeus corpus, but the change in their status will be subtle enough that he will catch a lot of flak for it.

    Obama’s first year in office is going to be rocky, and many of the the rocks he hits are probably going to be the result of his own supporters disillusionment.

  • MBI

    Ah, okay, I see what you’re saying. We’re talking about two different groups of voters here. I’m talking about the fanatics and the partisans — you’re talking about the crucial swing voters.

    I stand by what I said — his loyal fanbase will stand behind him until the end of time, granted that he doesn’t do anything Watergate-level bad. Look at how Bush was able to sustain the presidency after an unpleasant first term — if all the nation were swing voters, that wouldn’t have happened.

    Granted, my perspective comes from hanging around partisans like my Obama-freak friends and my rabid right-wing dad, and yes, the swing voters — the one who voted for but didn’t love Obama — could shank him in the coming four years. But at the same time, I’ve never seen the cult of personality Obama has. Bush sure didn’t have that cult of personality, and it took seven fucking years for the Republicans to turn on him.

  • MaryAnn

    But can we please put a stop to the over-the-top rhetoric comparing the Bush Adminstration to a dictatorship? I’m no fan of his policies but when after hearing stories about what one of my former girlfriends had to put up in her native Mexico and what what another former girlfriend’s relatives had to put up in Soviet-occupied Latvia and what some of my maternal relatives had to put up with in Communist Poland, I find all this hyperbole about how bad America has been to be just a bit much.

    I’m rolling my eyes now. Why does America have to get as bad as lot of other places are before we’re allowed to bitch about it? Mexico and Latvia and Communist Poland do not have the American Constitution as their founding document. We, supposedly, do. And the only way to prevent the U.S. getting as bad as those other places is to stop it before it happens. And when the president declares himself immune to the law, and acts like he is, and gets away with it because the branches of the government that are supposed to check him fail to do their jobs, then yes, we are on the road to being as bad as that.

    When the president can unilaterally declare someone an enemy of the state and throw him into jail without due process, well, shit, that is *precisely* the kind of crap that the American colonists bitched about in the Declaration of Independence.

    On Obama: I think there’s a middle ground between the two arguments here. The reason I couldn’t vote *for* Obama but voted *against* McCain is precisely because he is a regular ol’ politician, and even our regular ol’ Democrats are barely in the center, ideologically speaking, never mind actually to the left. So he’s limited in what he would want to achieve on his own, never mind what he *can* do. But real change *might* be possible with the active, motivated support of the American public pushing him to lead us to real change. If enough of us are willing to work and sacrifice for change, then it might be possible. Obama could never do it on his own. But, say, a modern New Deal that puts people to work doing jobs that really need to be done — like rebuilding our infrastructure, or educating our children — or a restructuring of our culture away from consumption and toward finding meaning in nonmaterial things might do that. But that will take all of us working in concert, and maybe giving up things we think we love (like recreational shopping). Obama can’t do that without us, and it’s change on that level that is needed to turn things around.

  • D

    I heard someone say that if anything, this is the first election the internet has won.

  • I’m rolling my eyes now. Why does America have to get as bad as lot of other places are before we’re allowed to bitch about it?

    I’m not saying we should not bitch about it. I’m saying we should keep a sense of perspective about it. And no, that doesn’t mean “shut up until everything improves around the world.” It means “be careful you don’t make the kind of comments that will convince most people to disregard your point-of-view.”

    Granted, election time is traditionally a time for hyperbole and I’m happy to see so much positive hyperbole from liberals for a change. But after all the talk I’ve read on the Net during the past year about Seven Days in May-style conspiracies in which the federal government would cancel free elections at the last minute, one would think that we would be a lot happier that things didn’t turn out that way.

    Instead, we’re starting to sound like those Republicans during the Clinton Administration who unwittingly watered down otherwise legitimate criticisms of government power by equating almost everything Clinton did in regard to Waco, the Elian Gonzalez controversy, etc., to fascism.

    I know I can’t speak for most people who post here but I rather not be like those guys just because I object to many of the actions of the current President.

    And I don’t say that because I don’t take GWB’s actions seriously. I have enough dark-skinned relatives–including some who could be mistaken for Arabs or Iranians–that I take GWB’s actions very seriously. And I’m glad he’s leaving office in January.

    But it still seems a bit much to compare the US to a militarily occupied country. Though after reading some of the hyperbole that’s been written by the Right during the last week, I find myself more and more inclined to apologize to The Gaucho for making such a big deal about his remark in the first place.

    Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.

Pin It on Pinterest