Quantcast
subscriber help

the film criticism aspect of cyber | by maryann johanson

because individuality is suddenly unAmerican

Today’s Hollywood has no place for personality, concludes Henry Stewart at The L Magazine.

Or perhaps because a movie about a talking animal that doesn’t come with its own Happy Meal is just too weird.

(Perhaps not coincidentally, Fantastic Mr. Fox did get the Happy Meal treatment in the U.K.… where it had grossed, before the extended Christmas holiday juggernaut, nearly £9 million… which would be the equivalent of $90 million in North America, where it’s actually made less than $20 million.)

This has been your WTF Thought for the Day.



Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/flick/public_html/wptest/wp-content/themes/FlickFilosopher/loop-single.php on line 106
posted in:
critic buzz
  • Brian

    . . . where it had grossed, before the extended Christmas holiday juggernaut, nearly £9 million… which would be the equivalent of $90 million in North America . . .

    Is there a missing digit in the British gross there? I hope the pound hasn’t suddenly become worth 10 times more than the dollar.

  • tomservo

    I think she included the population percentages into the numbers.

  • LaSargenta

    I dunno why FMF isn’t doing so well here…My son has seen it 3 times in the theater, twice with me, once with another grown up. It is a great movie and I think he wants to see it again. And again. And again.

    The other grownup is a graphic designer who dabbles in some animation, too. He thought that was some of the best animation he’s seen in years.

    Don’t other children want to see this? Or are we just weird? Or is the advertising not widespread enough? Or not enough screens? Or is it too “british”? (After all, wackbat looked a lot like cricket.)

  • CB

    “Individuality” has always been something that was respected in America in principle more than in practice. Be yourself, as long as you’re mostly like everyone else so as not to offend anyone by challenging them. Very few people have been able to get away with being truly unique and be respected for it rather than ostracized. Instead “individualism” just becomes another label attached to a kind of conformity. The best modern example of this phenomenon perhaps being Hot Topic. Cus buying your clothes there means you are Your Own Person.

    Anyway, yeah, I can see that affecting Mr. Fox. Though anyone who gives it a chance and goes to see it with an open mind would have a good chance of loving it.

  • JosephFM

    Where I live it is unfortunately not playing anymore, which means I missed it because of finals.

    And I am inclined to make a political wisecrack, given your headline, but I won’t.

  • Oh, we all find it easy to love individuality as long as the individual in question talks like us, thinks like us and never questions any of our assumptions and prejudices. But then we run into someone just a little bit different and suddenly we try our damnedest to mold him or her into someone more like ourselves. I’ve seen that happen on a lot of sites and even here it seems obvious that some expressions of individuality are more tolerated than others. (And yet this site is quite tolerant of differing opinions compared to, say, Big Hollywood.)

    As for the movies in question….first of all, we’re in the middle of a recession. People don’t generally seek out challenging fare in a recession. And those who might do so anyway probably aren’t in a position to buying too many full-price opening weekend movie tickets.

    Second of all, even those of us who like movies that are out of the ordinary don’t always agree on which out-of-the-ordinary movies are worth seeing.

    Yes, I’ve seen The Box and I was surprised to admit that I didn’t quite end up disliking it the way I feared I would–and this from someone who hated Donnie Darko. Then again I didn’t exactly walk out saying, “Hey! I really want to see that movie again.” And by the time I did see it, it was already in its second run–which makes my decision to go see it relatively meaningless in the eyes of most Hollywood bookkeepers.

    Besides, I’m at the age where I’m finding it harder and harder to resist the urge to stay home and watch a DVD with a friend or relative instead of going out and seeing a new release. And most of my fellow movie-goers–especially the kind that generally treat movie theatres like their living rooms and bring babies and undisciplined small children to movies that obviously aren’t made for babies and small children–aren’t making it easy for me to resist such an urge either.

  • MaryAnn

    Is there a missing digit in the British gross there? I hope the pound hasn’t suddenly become worth 10 times more than the dollar.

    No, it’s how we compare box office results between North America and the U.K., taking into account both the population disparity and the general differences in currency. If a film opens to $10 million in the U.S. and Canada, a comparable U.K. opening would be £1 million. If a film earns £9 million in the U.K., comparable North American earnings would be $90 million.

  • Brian

    No, it’s how we compare box office results between North America and the U.K., taking into account both the population disparity and the general differences in currency.

    That’s very interesting; I never knew that. My day job is in the world of economics, so I’m keen on those sorts of measures. Thanks for the clarification.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This