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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

poster convergence: ‘When in Rome’ and ‘Leap Year’

I hope this isn’t going to be a trend for 2010: posters that reduce women to simpering little girls.
Really, Amy Adams? Might you just faint your little old self at the prospect of an engagement ring? Is this 1815? Are you a character in a Jane Austen novel? Hell, I take that back: Jane Austen’s characters were more grownup than you are.

Really, Kristen Bell? Are you a naughty little thing who just got caught with her hand in the man jar? Oh my goodness: boys! Tee-hee-hee!

Why do marketers think this crap still sells? Or maybe the more pertinent question is: Why does this crap still sell? Why are so many people completely incapable of seeing women as adult people?



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  • wooster182

    Kristen Bell doesn’t look like a simpering girl to me there. She looks like a blonde bombshell vampire picking the remnants of her last date out of her teeth.

    But maybe that’s just because it’s Kristen Bell…

  • Ide Cyan

    1815: Ginger and Brigitte arrive at an isolated Northern Legion Trading Company fort in the middle of winter, with instructions to kill the boy…

    nope, not that 1815.

  • Dr Rocketscience

    Yeah, why is Kristen Bell picking her teeth? I appreciate the cliched hand position they were going for, but the photoshopper failed epically I think.

  • Ahem…perhaps because so many of today’s movies aren’t aimed at adults but at teenagers?

    And because denigration of older people–i.e. potential movie goers above the age of 30–has officially been seen as “good business practice” since the 1960s?

    And because so many social critics on the Net have been quarreling over the differences between Boomers and Xers that they forgot to notice this until they themselves got older?

    Look at a movie made about 60 or 50 years and see how mature a lot of the actresses act when they’re in their 20s compared to today’s female stars. Sure, there were some obvious exceptions but the fact remains that more adult behavior was expected from a person of a certain age back then. People started working earlier, people got married earlier, and people started households earlier.

    If you prefer to disregard that theory, well…I’ve got others…

  • Look at a movie made about 60 or 50 years and see how mature a lot of the actresses act when they’re in their 20s compared to today’s female stars. Sure, there were some obvious exceptions but the fact remains that more adult behavior was expected from a person of a certain age back then. People started working earlier, people got married earlier, and people started households earlier.

    What I should have said:

    Look at a movie made about 60 or 50 years ago and see how mature a lot of the actresses act when they’re in their 20s compared to today’s female stars who are at a similar age. Sure, there were some obvious exceptions but the fact remains that more adult behavior was expected from a person of a certain age back then. People started working earlier, people got married earlier, and people started households earlier. People in their twenties were encouraged to dress like adults, not teenagers, and adult behavior was not stigmatized as being too stuffy or uncool.

  • RyanT

    In Leap Year’s defense… it also looks as if Matthew Goode is about to pass out.

  • Paul

    I understood you the first time, Tonio, and agreed with you. I often find myself wondering when to call people boys and girls vs. men and women; do I judge by age or behavior. It’s probably why I’ve seen “boy-men” and “girl-women” floating around the Net. That’s for people who are legally adults but not emotionally.

    As for the Amy Adams pose, with her hand on her breast as if to say, “who, me?” actually looks a little evil; I’ve seen that look on women who just got off a snarky one-liner at my expense. When I see that look, my brain gears up for war of the wits.

  • Knightgee

    @Tonio: I know some people who are well into their 30s that I would classify as emotionally childish, it depends on how you’re raised, not when(though that certainly is a factor).

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