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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

trailer break: ‘Sex and the City 2’

Take a break from work: watch a trailer…


In my The Week in Women column this weekend, I despaired that Naomi Wolf had chosen Sex and the City’s protagonist Carrie Bradshaw as an icon of the just-ended decade… a positive icon! a feminist icon!

And then I see this trailer.

This is feminist? Carrie looks happiest here while contemplating her overstuffed walk-in closet. The rest of the trailer is all high fashion, exotic travel, and making out with rich men in limousines. If these women have anything on their minds other than clothes, men, babies, and money, I’m not seeing it here.

This may be fantasy, but it ain’t feminist fantasy.

Sex and the City 2 opens in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. on May 28.



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  • Brian

    For 2010, I resolve not to see this movie. Guaranteed success!

  • Alli

    One of my best friends told me over New Years that she would be dragging me to see this with her. She works at a domestic violence shelter, she taught women’s studies in grad school, she’s insanely frugal (her one TV cost $10), and yet she loves this stuff. She’s the total antithesis to these characters, but she loves it. We all have our guilty pleasures.

    As for whether Carrie Bradshaw is a feminist icon, that’s obviously debatable. Granted, I’ve only seen a few episodes, so I’m not an expert, but it is possible that she’s a stronger female than she looks in the trailer. Yes she’s a big shoe loving stereotype, but based on the few episodes I’ve seen, she likes herself. She knows who she is, and she doesn’t try to change it for anyone. And, that’s refreshing (even if I can’t stand her).

  • LaSargenta

    For 2010, I resolve not to see this movie. Guaranteed success!

    I second this. Foolishly, I did allow myself to be part of a gang of goils with the first one. (which I practically puked at. I hadn’t ever seen the series and was shocked at how uninteresting the people were on screen.)

    …she likes herself. She knows who she is, and she doesn’t try to change it for anyone. And, that’s refreshing (even if I can’t stand her).

    But, by this standard, I should be applauding Phyllis Schafly, too!

    I need more than that to think that I’ve got a positive female character. I’m not even asking for a feminist character or icon.

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