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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

question of the day: What do you think of the ending of ‘Lost’?

I wish I had taken a clean break from Lost, like I was on the verge of doing a couple of seasons back. Cuz I feel cheated by that ending. What? So they were all dead all along. So the island was purgatory. Or not really. But sorta. And so nothing really needs to make any semblance of sense. Polar bears? Wormholes? Smoke monsters? 4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42? Don’t worry about it: it was all just consciousness slipping away from dying brains.

Did Oceanic 815 even actually crash on the island? Or was the plane itself just a metaphor for the last moments of life?

Yeah, it made me cry to see everyone together and happy in the church in those last moments. But what did any of it actually mean? Was any of it real? Was it all supposed to be real, even the contradictory separate timelines?
I do not require tidy endings. I do not require that every plot thread be woven into a neat, square-edged tapestry. I do not require that every unanswered question be answered.

But I want some of that. I don’t feel like I got it. The basic premise of the show — what is the island? or, as Charlie expressed it earlier on, “Guys, where are we?” — remains unresolved. I find that inexcusable.

But that’s just me. What do you think of the ending of Lost?

(If you have a suggestion for a QOTD, feel free to email me. Responses to this QOTD sent by email will be ignored; please post your responses here.)



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  • Stephen King called that ending several years ago. Apparently he was right. My middle brother used to hint at it too when I’d visit him while he was watching Lost but that was back when Michelle Rodriguez was still on the show so obviously this theory was not a recent thing.

  • Devin

    I think you may have missed a few details at the end there. Just the flash sideways was purgatory where they all meet when they die. Everything that happened on the island happened on earth in real life.
    I think I do agree with you though on the details issue. I think it is irresponsible writing to just arbitrarily insert these plot devices that aren’t explored at all. There were two answers in the finale: what the flash sideways was, and the nature of the heart of the island. I know it’s kind of petty to fret over these details when it’s the characters that are really important, but seriously! This means all of that other garbage was really meaningless when we were led to believe it would make sense.
    The end characterization was great, very satisfying in that regard. I don’t know what I would have done better to end it besides filling plot holes. This ending seems to be what lost has been leading to but it does leave choice out of the question, and if there is no choice, then what’s the point really? I thought maybe it would lead to collective consciousness but that would be way too wacky metaphysical for lost.
    In the end, it would have been nice for it to be a bit more rational but, most of the characters were tied up nicely and it was truly a grandiose ending.

  • Keith

    I liked it. I stopped watching during Season 2, but I’ve kept up with things enough to get the gist of what has been going on. Thought they tied things up as well as can be expected.

    Given that we saw things from the Other’s perspective at times, I won’t assume that everyone died in the crash. I’ll assume the island was real (real enough for any such sci-fi type show), but was just a strange place with strange properties. Everything did apparently happen there.

    As Jack’s father says, “We all die sometime.” In death, time doesn’t have the same structure it seems to here. The parallel reality seemed to be some sort of mutual construct of souls in transition (sort of like the “construct” in the Matrix where they simulate reality as they prepare to go into the matrix itself). Since time has no real meaning in this place (the parallel reality), they can all exist there concurrently, even though they all died at different times in the real reality. Eventually, all their souls, who have been bound together by this extraordinary experience on the island, can reunite and together move on to whatever awaits them.

    Sure they could have answered more details about the specifics of the island, but that’s all incidental to the key aspect of the story. Most people would likely be disappointed with much more exposition. It would be impossible to live up to everyone’s imagination. Just as in our real lives, there is so much mystery and unanswered questions. We see and experience so many things in our lives, but who can really make sense of it all. Lost is this just take to extremes.

    I would probably have more appreciation for the show watching it after what I know now. It’s mainly just for the thrill and the experience. I know there are people who would like it to be more, but as in life that’s really all we get. However, they at least leave us with a fairly hopeful ending, one we would be so luck to have when we die.

  • Michael Brown

    Hmmm much ado about nothing. As usual they created more questions than they answered. With the dog in the last shot with Jack, does that mean the dog was dreaming too? Or dead? I noticed that Claire’s baby (Aaron?) was in the shot there in the church. Did the baby die too? And if Pretend Locke was really Pretend, then who stabbed Jack? I thought the Letterman Top Ten was really funny. At one point, almost a throwaway, Dave says something about the Smoke Monster coming out from underneath the door in the writers’ room. Well gosh, the Producers made a lot of money. ABC/Disney made a lot of money. The ratings were probably right through the roof. That was the point, right?

  • JohnnyInc

    So did they blow up the island in the past? They made it seem like the alternate timeline (or dead people timeline) was a split brought about by the bomb. Did the explosion just make them time travel back to the future? What was the point of the time travel in the grand scheme of things?

    I would have accepted that the island was purgatory or the gateway to hell or a dimension outside our reality. I would have accepted it was two ancient gods playing a game to devise mankind’s fate. But what I walked away with was a sense that the island didn’t matter at all. Jack crashed on an island; he left the island; he came back to the island; he defended the island; and now he is dead.

  • Drave

    I think it was a great ending for this season, but a terrible ending for the show. At the very least, I feel like there are two or three seasons worth of stuff still missing.

  • clay

    So they were all dead all along. So the island was purgatory.

    No. Just the flashes to the alternate universe. Desmond was helping them realize that they were dead by remembering the most meaningful time of their lives.

    Did Oceanic 815 even actually crash on the island? Or was the plane itself just a metaphor for the last moments of life?

    It crashed. Everything that happened, happened. Jack dies on the island, Hurley and Ben stay behind as the guardians (I smell sitcom spinoff!) and Kate, Claire, Sawyer, Frank, Miles and Richard escape to the mainland.

    But what did any of it actually mean?

    Subjective to each character. They all sorta dealt with their demons together and eventually excised them. Except for Ben, who clearly still had some stuff to work out. The thought of him standing outside the church will haunt me for a while.

    It wasn’t the perfect ending…while the first few “awakenings” were emotional it veered into maudlin overkill by the end. Only so much swelling orchestrations you can take in two and a half hours.

    The basic premise of the show — what is the island? or, as Charlie expressed it earlier on, “Guys, where are we?” — remains unresolved. I find that inexcusable.

    The most we got by way of explanation was from John Locke: “It’s a place where miracles happen.” Or Allison Janney: “The source of life, death and rebirth.” Vague, yes, but I’m happier with that than a clinical, scientific explanation of how exactly the island’s properties work the way they do. It’s a place that brought people together so they could find redemption.

  • MaryAnn wrote:

    I don’t feel like I got it.

    At least you can admit it now. Even with everything spelled out by Christian in the church, you still missed the most important bits of explanation. Lost wasn’t for you. It’s time to move on, MaryAnn. Let go.

    ;)

    As for me… I thought it was wonderful.

  • A.J.

    One of the cut scenes from the end of the finale is where Willy Wonka comes out from a door in one of the hills and says “Gah, I thought they’d never leave!” See how much that explains? ;)

  • Lisa

    Since it was the last show, I thought they could get away with all the swelling orchestrations they liked. I think your view of the finale depends on what you wanted from it. imho, they had pretty much answered all the stuff I needed them to, and I just wanted to see the characters happy. It’s always been an emotional show. I had quibbles with the ending e.g. Sayid with Shannon, instead of Nadia, but I think, ultimately, this was Jack’s afterlife/purgatory and he never knew Sayid with Nadia, he knew her with Sayid, so that’s ok.

    I like that we never found out exactly what the island is/was/will be because any explanation of that would only disappoint. I think that, while Jacob was not evil, he was certaintly completely fucked up and that’s why the island was as nutty as it was. There never needed to a be a smoke monster there – that was Jacob’s guilt and burden so I would imagine it was a calmer, happier place under Hurley’s rule. I like to think that Hurley lived a long time, looking after it. In short (I’m at work!), I loved it!

  • Hey at least the dog survived.

  • Alli

    Sure they could have answered more details about the specifics of the island, but that’s all incidental to the key aspect of the story.

    I don’t think asking what the island was is a “specific detail” of the show. Figuring out what the island is was the WHOLE POINT OF THE SHOW.

    You’re telling me the key aspects of the story is that in the end they all meet up in the afterlife and travel to heaven together because they had a really good time on the island?

    So if the island was just a place where all of these people met to “redeem” themselves, would it have mattered if it sunk to the bottom of the ocean? And why in the world did they need to go back in time, just so Juliet could blow herself up?

  • mortadella

    Emotionally I’m very satisfied with the finale. They were each other’s destiny and always belonged together to bring out the best and sometimes the worst in each other. Otherwise, you can view a lot of it like a Rorschach inkblot test….the meaning depends on who’s looking, I suppose, and it doesn’t bother me a bit. The show was always about people….the crazy stuff on the island (while very cool) just helped the characters discovery what they were really made of.

  • Jim Mann

    Lost in the end was frustrating. I thought over the six seasons of the show, it was at its strongest when it was science fictional and at its weakest when it sunk into mysticism, and unfortunately that’s where the ending went.

    And what made the ending particularly frustrating was that the only explained the flash sideways, which to me was the least interesting part of the whole thing. I was far more interested in the “real” world of the island, not what now turns out to be a waiting room for the afterlife that the flash sideways universe was. But they never tied up the details of the island.

    Finally, there are some things they just dropped or clearly changed their minds on along the way, the biggest of them being Walt. In the first season, Walt was being set up as a focal point of everything, but in the last four seasons, he really only is even a factor once that I can remember. But we can go on listing things that not only weren’t explained but which I’m not sure really in retrospect fit in with everything else. So in the end, while it was a show that I often enjoyed along the way, much of the final season and the ending were a huge letdown.

  • RyanT

    Loved it. I’m reading a lot of reviews/reactions this morning though of people completely missing that the island IS NOT purgatory/limbo and thus everyone’s first season theory of that being the case is wrong. The flash sideways are purgatory though, which I’m completely fine with.

    Character-wise, the show gave each of them their due and I was more than pleased. My goodness, I was sobbing like a baby more times than I could count.

  • Lisa

    I think Walt was a bit of a smokescreen. The Others took him because they kidnapped children – that’s what the Others did. Ben made a kinda obscure comment about Walt being more than they could handle or that he wasn’t what they thought he was. They didn’t take him for his superpowers – they were surprised by that, I think.

    I’m still not a 100% on what the sideways world was or how it was created but I did watch this at 2:00am and I’m now exhausted. I will watch it again. But y’know they saved the world!

    As an aside, I think Desmond ended up being a failsafe, cos if he hadn’t pulled the plug, Jack would not have been able to kill Flocke.

  • JoshDM

    I think you may have missed a few details at the end there. Just the flash sideways was purgatory where they all meet when they die. Everything that happened on the island happened on earth in real life.

    Devin is correct. The Alternate Timeline of Season 6 was purgatory. A purgatory where no one remembered the best time of their lives, where they were all on the island. To move on, they all had to remember their deaths and to do so they had to remember the best times of their lives. The last one to do so was Jack.

    The rest of it all happened in real life. Kate, Lapidus, Claire, Miles, Richard, and Sawyer all got off the island. Hurley, Ben, Vincent, and probably Rose, Bernard, and likely any left-over others like Cindy the Flight Attendant and the two kids, and any other people, all stayed (or eventually left – based on Hurley’s rules) on the island. This can be inferred by Hurley’s comment to Ben about being the best #2.

    Ben is the best shit.

  • JoshDM

    I don’t think asking what the island was is a “specific detail” of the show. Figuring out what the island is was the WHOLE POINT OF THE SHOW.

    Alli does say it best though. While I’m satisfied about what happened to all the characters (in Purgatory, time is irrelevant; heck, they could have run into Richard there!), I want to know MORE about the Dharma Initiative than what was shown, I want to know about the Egyptians who carved all the areas beneath the island, I want to know if that fluid was coolant to, I dunno, keep a buried alien ship from destroying the world. :/

    The show was a show of faith. I’m a man of science. That’s why I’m still not satisfied.

  • JoshDM

    I think Walt was a bit of a smokescreen.

    I was talking to someone and they mentioned that a story-based explanation could be Walt’s psychic abilities were actually electromagnetic properties (caused a bird to fly into a window, etc.), and since those could muck with the island, they removed him from the island.

    Again, man of science here.

  • Bassygalore

    I was very disappointed in the ending too, though I do understand (and appreciate) what others enjoyed about it. I honestly do.

    For me, I didn’t get what I needed though – I was always intrigued with the mystery of the island. Why did it exist in the first place? Was it just some gathering spot for energy and why could you turn a wheel to shift time? The time shift aspect, that intrigued me and I wanted to know more. Or maybe I just missed the episode that explained it… Also, was the hatch just one of the areas that had built up (magnetic) energy and the hole with the golden light carried the main energy source?

    Desmond thought that because he didn’t push the button in time it caused their plane to crash and Jacob said that HE brought them to the island as candidates. Did he have some kind of mind power over Desmond that caused Desmond to make a mistake just as their plane was nearing the island? What about the plane that was carrying Mr. Eko’s brother? Did Desmond accidentally crash that one too?

    After Desmond destroyed the hatch and absorbed the energy, he could see the future. Did that ability go away after he returned to the island the second time?

    If this island was so remote, how did the Dharma Initiative know about it in the first place? Did Jacob tell them about it? The exact coordinates and everything? Though I swear I thought Jacob’s ‘mother’ said he and smoke monster couldn’t leave the island and yet we saw flashes where he encountered Widmore in real life. Why would he want the Dharma Initiative there anyway? Just to create some drama?

    Island questions aside, if the alternate universe was purgatory, whose purgatory was it? Desmond was the one who essentially brought everyone together, so would it be his?

    As someone else brought up, what happened to Walt? The Others were so intent to capture Walt in the first season. In flashbacks, they showed us that he had some kind of ESP and yet they let him and Michael sail away out of the storyline (though Michael obviously came back). Did they just decide that they didn’t know what to do with Walt’s character?

    Too many things were left unexplained for me and maybe it’s up to me to fill in the holes myself or maybe I just wasn’t paying enough attention and I missed details. If anyone can help me piece this altogether, I would appreciate it, because I am totally lost…pun may or may not be intended.

  • JoshDM

    I’m not defending the show, but I’ll help with some confusion.

    I was always intrigued with the mystery of the island. Why did it exist in the first place?

    We don’t know. It exists in the “real world” as far as we can tell. Apparently it’s been around since before the Egyptians. The “Mother” who took Jacob and Samuel (it’s been revealed that was MIB’s name in the script) did become a smoke monster, but this was never shown onscreen; just the results of such. The Egyptians knew about the smoke monster concept as this was in their hieroglyphs. What did the Egyptians create or cover? Some sort of energy that required a stone cap in a little pond. If you moved the cap, then you’d hear some horrible spin-down mechanical sounds and the island would start to sink. To me, this indicates there is probably some sort of technology (Atlantean, alien, or otherwise – heck, it could have been from the future like my own theory) generating electromagnetic fields which help maintain the island and can be harnessed for other properties like time travel, teleportation (to Tunisia!), generating smoke monster people, or other purposes.

    All we know is that there is Egyptian shit covering something that generates weird electromagnetic fields; we’re never told the further origin, and unfortunately it is NOT RELEVANT to the story that the writers ended up telling us. That originally read “wanted to tell”, but I know they changed their story around.

    Jacob said that HE brought them to the island as candidates.

    Jacob claimed a lot of things. Whether he just claimed them himself or he worked situations so that things were “in place” to happen is up to debate. There was no mind control involved; just elaborate rube goldberg-esque set-ups. No one seems to know (not even Jack or Hurley at the beginning) what abilities Jacob had or was able to do. I’m sure that Jacob figured out his abilities over time, if he even really had any.

    All the vehicles that we know that came to the island (Oceanic, Ajira, the prop plane, the balloon, Desmond’s sailing ship, the submarines, the Black Rock, the Roman ship) all arrived through varied means. Desmond only created the situation which affected Oceanic.

    After Desmond destroyed the hatch and absorbed the energy, he could see the future. Did that ability go away after he returned to the island the second time?

    Desmond’s abilities appeared to have faded over time; and seem to have vanished completely once he left the island electromagnetic vicinity on the helicopter. A variation of them were reinvigorated in him once Widmore blasted him with energy this season. This variation allowed him to connect directly with his Purgatory-self. I do not believe he understood that his Purgatory-self was in Purgatory. On the other hand, I do believe his Purgatory-self understood everything.

    If this island was so remote, how did the Dharma Initiative know about it in the first place?

    As explained in the episode where we learn about the Southern California hatch known as The Lighthouse, very smart scientists detected electromagnetic anomalies and built The Lighthouse Hatch to track the anomalies, which turned out to be the island. We aren’t really told anything further, but apparently that’s all we needed to know about that.

    Though I swear I thought Jacob’s ‘mother’ said he and smoke monster couldn’t leave the island and yet we saw flashes where he encountered Widmore in real life.

    There were never any encounters broadcast to us showing Jacob meeting Charles Widmore off-island. We, the audience, are only told by Charles that he met with Jacob. We do not and will never know if this is a lie.

    Why would he want the Dharma Initiative there anyway? Just to create some drama?

    We do not know for certain if Jacob summoned the “Drama” Initiative, or if the really smart scientists just detected the anomalies, as was originally explained to us.

    Island questions aside, if the alternate universe was purgatory, whose purgatory was it?

    It was THE purgatory. Everyone shared purgatory and was there until they could remember their own deaths. Then they had the choice to transcend to heaven or stick around. Ben stuck around, as he apparently wanted more time with Alex and Rousseau.

    As someone else brought up, what happened to Walt?

    I answer to some degree in a prior post, above. The non-show reason to get rid of Walt was because he physically grew too fast. The show-reason is never explained, but we can infer that his psychic abilities were actually electromagnetic properties and that caused some sort of conflict with the island and it was best that he was removed.

  • MaryAnn

    The most we got by way of explanation was from John Locke: “It’s a place where miracles happen.”

    Reminds me of that cartoon about the scientist who plug a hole in his equation with “Here, a miracle happens.” But that was supposed to be a joke.

    Or Allison Janney: “The source of life, death and rebirth.” Vague, yes,

    Not just vague: wrong. If the island is “the” source of “life,” we certainly never saw anything like that.

    but I’m happier with that than a clinical, scientific explanation of how exactly the island’s properties work the way they do. It’s a place that brought people together so they could find redemption.

    But why does the island give a shit if anyone gets “redeemed”?

  • Bassygalore

    JoshDM – thanks for the clarification on some of my questions. Particulary this:
    As explained in the episode where we learn about the Southern California hatch known as The Lighthouse, very smart scientists detected electromagnetic anomalies and built The Lighthouse Hatch to track the anomalies, which turned out to be the island. We aren’t really told anything further, but apparently that’s all we needed to know about that.

    This must have been the episode I missed (I missed a couple).

  • JoshDM

    You’d have remembered the scene. My bad though, it’s referred to as The Lamp Post. Definite Narnia inference there.

  • JoshDM

    For LOST, this guy does it way better than MAJ. Which is understandable since she “consistently didn’t get it”. :)

    No seriously. Go read that.

  • Dave

    In the end (at least to me) it was about Jack learning that sometimes you don’t need to know the why and just have to accept that something is. Jack doubted the island for most of the series and at the end defended it without getting his answers because he had faith that it was the right thing to do.

    Would it have changed anything that happened if you found out what was under the pool that was the heart of the island? Nothing except you would have felt better because everything would be nice and pat.

    Also I don’t think anyone in the story knows what the island actually is. Whitmore thinks it’s a Electromagnetic annomoly, Jacob thought it was a cork to keep evil out of the world and his mother thought it was the source of all that is good. It doesn’t matter why the island exists only that it does. In fact for me if it was an alien ship or nano-bots or something else that was a “simple” answer it would have been a let down. Sometimes it better not to know.

  • JoshDM

    Sometimes it better not to know.

    And sometimes writers are lazy.

  • Dave

    This is a revelation I had about halfway through this season of Lost that I think is why I’m not having problems with the ending. Lost is not Science Fiction it’s Fantasy. Is it ever explained how “The Force” works even with the inclusion of the hated midichlorians? Is it ever explained how the One Ring makes Frodo invisible? No because it doesn’t matter. There is an island that contains a pool containing huge powers and if it’s ever destroyed bad things happen to the whole world. Does adding the words… because of Nanomachines to the end of that sentence really make a difference?

    Also don’t get me started on Nanomachines in your explanation because your take on them is purely speculative since nothing like that exists and therefore means as much to reality as just saying “It’s Magic”. In the end it was a story about Jack that takes place on the island, but isn’t really about the island just like The Lord of the Rings wasn’t about the ring but the journey to destroy it.

  • leontineg

    It pretended to be science fiction, but it turned out to be fantasy. Not fun fantasy, either; one of those annoying quasi-mystical ones with vague religious overtones and no internal consistency. Except in those, at least the polar bears and glowing wells and A-bombs would have turned out to be symbols for something, and in this case they were just….well, nobody knows. Pointless, I guess.

    Nanobots would have been more satisfying b/c we were treated to so much really fun scientific-sounding mumbo jumbo throughout the entire series. So we expected a really fun scientific-sounding ending. Personally, I wish the island had turned out to be a giant spaceship and flown away at the end, like the castle in Rocky Horror. That would have been awesome.

  • stryker1121

    The show has always been about faith v. science…I’m just a little disappointed faith won out in the finale. Abstract spirtualism that seemed to be ghost written by Mitch Albom does not make for a satisfying ending.

  • Andrew

    They asked and answered the “wait so were we dead the whole time” thing specifically in the finale and yet the amount of people who still think that’s what happened are astoundingly large

    Did everyone’s TV just cut out sound for the Jack/Christian conversation? You know, the one when he says “no of course that happened”?

  • Three words for you. Ashes to Ashes. Similar things going on, but a properly satisfying emotional ending. The Gene Genie never disappoints!

  • Lisa

    2 words for you: Bitch, please!

  • JoshDM

    I can now accept that the entire show was a show of faith with the trappings of science and about how science cannot be used to understand/comprehend/analyze faith (re: the complete failure of the Dharma Initiative).

    Then-again, those of us who are (Wo)Men of Science can sleep soundly with the theory that underneath all of that Egyptian (or Atlantean!!!) sculpture there lies a giant science engine of Lemurian or alien origin, causing electromagnetic rifts powerful enough to harness the magnetism of bad souls and repel the polarity of good souls.

  • Now, now Lisa – you’re entitled to prefer Lost to Ashes to Ashes, but I’m also entitled to think Matthew Graham and Ashley Pharoah came up with a more consistent and coherent alternative plain of existence than J.J. Abrams.

  • Jack

    Hey at least the dog survived.

    Actually…He’s dead too.

    By “The “End”, they have all passed on. Some earlier than Jack, some later. I am not confused in any way with the actual “plot” of the Finale. Or how they dodged providing answers with teary reunions and religious symbolism.

    It was John Locke (the real one) who was so much more interested in the Island and all the mysteries than any of the people living on it. Why on EARTH would any loyal viewer think differently? It was Damon and Carlton who mislead actual advocates of Lost and pulled the rug out from under us by not answering the mysterious questions THEY created.

    The GREATS, such as Rod Serling, who actually had IDEAS and FOLLOWED through with them, would never had left the audience hanging the way these two pretenders have. WHY did they do it?

    Because they are cowards.

    They were too afraid to be criticized with THEIR answers (maybe they had none after all) that they did the worst thing imaginable…

    They did nothing.

  • Lisa

    @ Jo the Hat – it does my head in that people even dare to compare

    but when you said A2A had a “properly satisfying emotional ending” my head exploded. (Let’s not spoil it for MaryAnn though)

    JJ’s had mostly nowt to do with it for years now. He may have helped devise that final scene but blame Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse, if you really feel you must.

  • **SPOILERS FOR ASHES TO ASHES***

    Jo the Hat (Tue May 25 10, 7:53AM):

    Three words for you. Ashes to Ashes. Similar things going on, but a properly satisfying emotional ending. The Gene Genie never disappoints!

    OMG Yes… Ashes to Ashes was so great. And, for a moment as I was watching the Lost finale, I was having a little deja vu. But Lost went a different way with things, so it was okay. Wouldn’t it have been weird though if they’d both ended the same way?

  • Dart

    Well it’s been a few days, and I’ve been thinking a lot about the things that disapointed me with this finale.

    Here’s one: The Sixth Sense had a giant twist ending, and my family bought the video when it came out and we re-watched it to notice the clues that pointed to the ending. I’ve watched “Lost” for a couple of years and I was certain (CERTAIN) that we would get answers for the cabin, or Walt, or the numbers, or the ghost apparitions post-island, or why Hurley, Miles and Walt had special powers in the first place (etc, etc). If this finale had been better, then I would’ve re-watched some of the series to see if there were any clues hinting at its awesome ending. But after this ending, I have no desire to even watch it at all. The writers only gave us the fact that the island was a magical island and told us that sometimes things can’t get explained. Thinking of all the discussions and predictions that went on because of “Lost,” I can’t help but feel a little betrayed. People would point out that “Lost” got people thinking, period, which is a good thing for sure. But what intellectual blueballs! Sure, “Lost” was a mystery, but a Loch Ness sized mystery.

    Here’s two: The idea that they were in purgatory couldn’t work at all! It’s contradictory and self-defeating. First off, if in purgatory Jack and Juliet happened to have made a child, why did they never flashback to the island times at all? And if purgatory is full of dead people, then who the hell is Jack’s son supposed to be? A collective illusion? Amazing! Then there’s the fact that Jack gets cuts appearing all over his body because that’s how he died, and yet all the other people never noticed anything wrong with their own bodies, even though many of them died of explosions and gunshots. If ghosts stay on the island when they haven’t moved on, then I don’t understand how in the hell Christian Sheperd could be in purgatory as well.

    Here’s three: They didn’t even have the fucking decency to tell us the MIB’s real name. Jerks.

  • Lisa

    Here’s my take on a few of those questions. The Others took Walt because they couldn’t have kids themselves. Walt had special powers that they couldn’t control (didn’t they stick him in the brain washing room?) so they wanted rid. Michael did them a favour by taking him back and leaving the island.

    The Cabin was a metaphor for the island experience of Smokie as a whole. He couldn’t leave it. How creepy it is to think about that whole help me scene now. Locke thought he had to save Smokie who was pretending to be Jacob. Chills! The ash round the cabin was a clue to how people could protect themselves from Smokie, much good that it ultimately helped people. Jacob, I am assuming used to live in the Cabin but then he left – a sign that he was preparing himself to die and leave the island too.

    On island apparitions can be explained by mostly being Smokie. I would only believe Miles and Hurley’s meetings and conversations with ghosts. Post island, I can only think of Michael and Jack but I’m probably wrong. Hurley, as I said was probably actually talking to Charlie, Eko, etc. For Michael and Jack, it’s hard to say why they saw their ghosts. Guilt, Jacob or Smokie – it’s hard to say.

    While the purgatory was, imho, a collective consciousness, I think it was partly Jack’s story at the end. He was trying to resolve his daddy issues and have a functional relationship with a woman, albeit his divorced wife.

    Michael explained that he was stuck on the island when he apologised to Hurley which I thought was a bit unfair but explainable by the fact that he and Walt weren’t availiable for filming.

    How could they match the creativity of people calling MIB Flocke or Mocke? small buns!

    I gave up on the numbers around the time of the Valenzetti equation – crap at maths, see!

    Jack seeing Christian Shepherd at the end was a cathartic, tear jerking, field of dreams moment. Christian Shepherd really? – how come we missed that?!?! Also nodded to the long running mystery of where his body ended up, which amused me no end!

  • Lisa

    Also Lost>Life on Mars>Ashes to Ashes

    That is all.

  • JEREMY

    Anybody remember a little show called “The Twilight Zone”? For you young folk,it was a sci-fi anthology show which featured a different storyline every week. Many of the stories had plot twists and surprise endings,but the underlying theme was revealed at the end. Many of the themes were life-lessons about time,life,death,and what comes after. The final episode of “Lost” was,for me,very much like a “Twilight Zone” episode.Every little plot twist and even the characters themselves represented the underlying themes of life,death,and What Comes After.Somewhere in another dimension,a dimension of Sight,Sound,and Mind,Rod Serling is very pleased with the producers of this show.They probably watched “The Twilight Zone”, too .

  • Dart | May 27, 2010 4:05 AM:

    The idea that they were in purgatory couldn’t work at all! It’s contradictory and self-defeating.

    This is a little disingenuous, don’t you think? You’ve got this concrete idea of what Purgatory is, which is fine… but why do you insist your interpretation of things is the only one? Most importantly, you’ve assigned this “purgatory” label to Lost all by yourself, so not only are you applying a narrow (and personal) expectation to the events of the finale, you’re defining it in terms that are not used in the actual episode. Nobody calls it “purgatory” — it’s just “a place you all made together” — so why should your personal definition of Purgatory being violated be something that ruins the ending for you?

    I mean, it’s fine if you want it to be that way and all, just recognize that you’ve made an unrequired leap in logic, so your argument isn’t really going to be able to convince anybody of anything except that you’re disappointed. :)

  • Dart

    Nope, I’m just assuming that it’s purgatory because that’s what people are deciding to label it as, that’s all. Honestly, I called it the “dead world” before talking about the finale with others. I don’t have any expectations of what purgatory should be like. Whatever this place was, it didn’t seem to convince, for the reasons that even this “place they all made together” was full of holes.

  • Dart

    And yeah, still kinda disapointed anyway.

  • Lisa

    The idea that, before you pass on to whatever, you get to meet all the people you’ve loved the most and who have had the greatest impact on you is a really moving one. It reminds me of a Japanese movie I saw once about people in the afterlife and they all have to pick their favorite memory to live in forever – can’t remember what it’s called. I think the place they all made together was a beautiful idea, we probably all want to see people who’ve died again.

  • Newbia

    There are two Lost viewers: those who watched it for the characters and those who watched it for the mystery. I always, always watched it for the characters. Their stories, their hopes and heartbreaks, and their drama were what really made the show wonderful. The mystery I never cared about — I realized soon that they were never going to give us any answers, they were just going to keep on piling more mystery crap. For the character viewers, the ending was perfectly satisfying. It may have left a lot of plot threads untied, but there were no emotional threads left untied.

  • wooster182

    I didn’t get the impression that the island was purgatory at all. If they wouldn’t have met, they wouldn’t have bonded and created a place of purgatory for when they did die. It was clear that when Jack perished on the island, he then floated to purgatory, and then into the afterlife, whatever that may be. Because they lived together, they didn’t die alone. Michael, who did choose to live alone, is forced to stay on the island a trapped soul.

  • Lisa

    I loved the characters but I was also genuinely thrilled by the mystery. I feel that they answered most of the questions I needed them to. It annoys me to see all these 100 unanswered questions articles because people who say that weren’t paying attention. Polar bears? C’mon, are we still at that?

    Desmond staring up the hatch hole at the start of season 2? Chills! Of course they had to keep introducing mysteries and new characters – they had to keep the show interesting. Each year, every show introduces new characters, new plots, new themes and journeys to stay fresh. So many other shows have tried and failed to do what Lost did. Look at the Nine – great opening episode but after the robbery, there was nothing left to say.

  • JoshDM

    Slow clap for College Humor : LIST OF OUTSTANDING LOST QUESTIONS.

    Nicely done.

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