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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

get yer official 50 Shades of Grey branded bondage merch (and other adventures in social networking)

What my followers on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ saw today:
• Everyone knows poor people don’t deserve art. Danny Boyle joins plea to halt Henry Moore sale

• If only Nathan Fillion weren’t Canadian… (One of today’s ShirtPunch! tees.) 2012 Wheaton/Fillion: A Chance for Change

2012 Wheaton/Fillion: A Chance for Change

• Don’t worry, this headline is fear-mongering linkbait, pure and simple, but this is notable for the absolute worst Photoshop job I’ve ever seen from a supposedly professional publishing outfit. Zac Efron favourite to play Luke Skywalker in new Disney Star Wars films

Zac Efron badly Photoshopped as Luke Skywalker

• Science as entertainment. But of course! Geeks, comedians and academics are putting the fun back into science

• Branded bondage merch. Because I know you’ve been waiting for this… The Official Fifty Shades of Grey Pleasure Products Collection

(hat-tips for today’s links: Katy, Neima)



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  • Danielm80

    I’ve said it before: I want to go to a store that sells wallpaper and pick up all the grey color samples. I’d put them together and make a “50 Shades of Grey” T-shirt. I bet I could sell it and make a fortune.

  • teenygozer

    I don’t think saying (in what I can only assume are sarcastic tones) ” Everyone knows poor people don’t deserve art” is fair to the people involved in this knotty problem.  They’re struggling with a no-win situation.  It is sadly true that there is a very, very good chance that someone’s going to nab this particular piece of art to sell the metal it’s made of for pennies on the dollar and the people who are responsible for the statue simply can’t afford the insurance–the cost to insure must be ridiculous.  They’re not maliciously trying to deprive poor people a piece of art.  The suggestion that perhaps the statue could be moved somewhere “safer” sounds terribly well-meaning on the part of the very nice, privileged people who signed the letter protesting the sale, but did they offer to pay the insurance?  Did they offer anything more concrete than your basic “golly gee, we think this is awfully sad, can’t you guys maybe figure out a way to do something about it so it doesn’t happen?”

    I wonder how much striking off a copy made of a modern, long-wearing fiberglass would cost?  Maybe the people who signed the letter could be touched for a donation?  Put their money where their mouth is, and all.

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