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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

Despicable Me 2 dropped almost *74 percent* in its second weekend in the UK

sadminions

According to Box Office Mojo.

Huh.

Maybe audiences are agreeing with my take on the film as pretty despicable itself. I mean, sure, the weather was nice this past weekend, but that drastic a drop says word-of-mouth on the film is really bad.


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movie buzz
  • Danielm80

    That seems to be the trend this summer. In the U.S., a couple of films had huge drops in their second weeks. And The Lone Ranger somehow managed to have a huge drop in its first week. Of course, one of the films that dropped was Man of Steel, which got a really positive review on this site. Maybe the drop in earnings has less to do with quality than with short attention spans.

  • singlestick

    RE: Maybe audiences are agreeing with my take on the film as pretty despicable itself. I mean, sure, the weather was nice this past weekend, but that drastic a drop says word-of-mouth on the film is really bad.

    Not sure. Most indicators seem to suggest that not only is the word-of-mouth positive, but that parents are fleeing the unsatisfying “Lone Ranger” and giving an extra box office boost to “Despicable Me 2,” at least in the US.

    I also disagree that the film is racist. Some critics seem to be bending over backwards to see the villain Eduardo as some kind of stereotype, even though they are rarely clear as to exactly what stereotypes are supposedly at play. One critic noted that “El Macho” has a “…mansion-looking place, so you get the impression that he’s not from humble means…meaning he makes his money in other ways.”

    http://www.biculturalmom.com/2013/07/04/despicable-me-2-review-violence-mexican-stereotypes/

    He’s a freaking supervillain, he’s got a supervillain’s lair! And the play on his being a luchador is actually a nice touch.

    Even odder is the accusation that El Macho’s son is a racist depiction of a “Latin Lover.” But the whole thing involving one of Gru’s daughter’s seems to be a satire on the daughter’s infatuation with a typical “Bad Boy.” However, one significant weakness of the film is that you never learn what happens to the son after the bad guy is defeated.

    The film is currently number 1 in Mexico and Spain. It might be interesting to track interest and reaction here.

    I can better understand some of the charges of sexism, but even here it does not seem so much that the women are portrayed negatively, but that Gru is afraid of women. Nor does he single out women to be targets of his bad behavior. And can you really have a character who is despicable, but magically not despicable towards women?

  • parents are fleeing the unsatisfying “Lone Ranger” and giving an extra box office boost to “Despicable Me 2,” at least in the US.

    I *was* talking specifically about the UK. *The Lone Ranger* doesn’t even open here till August.

    can you really have a character who is despicable, but magically not despicable towards women?

    You can have a movie about a despicable character that does not appear to share his despicableness itself. It’s not Gru who treats women badly here, but the film itself.

    And the play on his being a luchador is actually a nice touch.

    You may think so. Others find it absurdly stereotypical.

    I cannot respond to what other critics wrote — you’d have to ask them about that. But I don’t think it’s El Macho’s house that’s the problem.

  • RogerBW

    In the UK, I get the impression that the take for children’s films depends heavily on the weather: if it’s sunny, children get taken to parks and other outdoor places rather than cinemas.

  • Beowulf

    Well, Despicable Me (which I have not seen) has led the U.S. BO since it opened and is likely to do so this weekend.

    I really liked Lone Ranger, even though I can easily agree with many of the barbs hurled at it. There is a great 105-minute movie in there somewhere.

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