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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

what’s on iTunes, Amazon UK Instant Video, blinkbox, Curzon on Demand, Netflix UK, BBC iPlayer (from Jul 28)

streamUKjul28

What’s new, what’s hot, and what you may have missed, now available to stream.

itunes

streaming now, before it’s in cinemas

green light
Happy Christmas: compulsively watchable; Joe Swanberg is a master of the subtlest of dramatic observation, and his films are unlike anything other filmmakers are giving us right now [my review] [iTunes UK]

streaming now, before it’s on dvd

green light
Divergent: it’s not wildly different than other science fiction, hero’s journey, and adventure movies; sometimes we call such stories archetypal… mythic, even [my review] [iTunes UK]
green light
The Double: painfully funny odyssey of personal ineffectualness that is bitterly wonderful in how it revels in the decrepit horror of the everyday world [my review] [iTunes UK]
green light
Muppets Most Wanted: Kermit the Frog takes on his biggest challenge yet: dual roles… and truly puts the villain in vaudevillian [my review] [iTunes UK]
green light
Starred Up: could be the most realistic depiction of the horribleness and the ineffectiveness of institutional incarceration — on levels that impact both the individual and society on the whole — that I’ve ever seen [my review] [iTunes UK]
yellow for maybe
Rio 2: this is what passes for a children’s movie these days: a 1950s sitcom drawn in pretty tropical CGI colors with a few mostly forgettable songs tossed in [my review] [iTunes UK]

new to stream

green light
Noah: a Biblical action disaster fantasy epic that is completely bonkers, endlessly entertaining, and actually religious in that inspiring-and-instructional way that you don’t need to take as literal truth to see the wisdom of [my review] [iTunes UK]

I caught up with…

yellow for maybe
Yves Saint Laurent: biopic of “fashion’s little prince” offers all the elegant precision of a fashion shoot — it’s beautiful, and cold — but lacks a lot of necessary context [my review] [iTunes UK]

Amazon Instant Video

streaming now, before it’s in cinemas

green light
Happy Christmas: compulsively watchable; Joe Swanberg is a master of the subtlest of dramatic observation, and his films are unlike anything other filmmakers are giving us right now [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]

streaming now, before it’s on dvd

green light
Divergent: it’s not wildly different than other science fiction, hero’s journey, and adventure movies; sometimes we call such stories archetypal… mythic, even [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
green light
The Double: painfully funny odyssey of personal ineffectualness that is bitterly wonderful in how it revels in the decrepit horror of the everyday world [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
green light
Muppets Most Wanted: Kermit the Frog takes on his biggest challenge yet: dual roles… and truly puts the villain in vaudevillian [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]

new to stream

green light
Noah: a Biblical action disaster fantasy epic that is completely bonkers, endlessly entertaining, and actually religious in that inspiring-and-instructional way that you don’t need to take as literal truth to see the wisdom of [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]

I caught up with…

yellow for maybe
Yves Saint Laurent: biopic of “fashion’s little prince” offers all the elegant precision of a fashion shoot — it’s beautiful, and cold — but lacks a lot of necessary context [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]

new to Prime

green light
The Informant: Steven Soderbergh’s potent satire on corporate malfeasance and a deliciously twisted portrait of the people do who corporate evil [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
green light
Lilo & Stitch: astonishingly lovely, tremendously moving, outrageously funny animated dramedy [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
green light
Rock of Ages: wildly funny, funnily sexy, and hugely toe-tapping; Tom Cruise steals the show as if he weren’t already a mega movie star [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
green light
Ted: warm, generous, and human while it’s giving a boot in the ass to the pop-culture icon of the overgrown manchild; Mark Wahlberg is fantastic [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]
yellow for maybe
Snow White and the Huntsman: wants to be grand and epic but cannot summon the emotion to support such an ambition, but this earnest high-fantasy retelling is sporadically diverting [my review] [Amazon UK Instant Video]

blinkbox

streaming now, before it’s in cinemas

green light
Happy Christmas: compulsively watchable; Joe Swanberg is a master of the subtlest of dramatic observation, and his films are unlike anything other filmmakers are giving us right now [my review] [blinkbox]

streaming now, while it’s still in cinemas

yellow for maybe
Joe: Nicolas Cage finally gets away from his shouty, cartoony madmen, but it’s hard to shake the sense that this was laboriously constructed around him as a showcase [my review] [blinkbox]

streaming now, before it’s on dvd

green light
Divergent: it’s not wildly different than other science fiction, hero’s journey, and adventure movies; sometimes we call such stories archetypal… mythic, even [my review] [blinkbox]
green light
The Double: painfully funny odyssey of personal ineffectualness that is bitterly wonderful in how it revels in the decrepit horror of the everyday world [my review] [blinkbox]
green light
Muppets Most Wanted: Kermit the Frog takes on his biggest challenge yet: dual roles… and truly puts the villain in vaudevillian [my review] [blinkbox]
yellow for maybe
Rio 2: this is what passes for a children’s movie these days: a 1950s sitcom drawn in pretty tropical CGI colors with a few mostly forgettable songs tossed in [my review] [blinkbox]

new to stream

green light
Noah: a Biblical action disaster fantasy epic that is completely bonkers, endlessly entertaining, and actually religious in that inspiring-and-instructional way that you don’t need to take as literal truth to see the wisdom of [my review] [blinkbox]

I caught up with…

yellow for maybe
Yves Saint Laurent: biopic of “fashion’s little prince” offers all the elegant precision of a fashion shoot — it’s beautiful, and cold — but lacks a lot of necessary context [my review] [blinkbox]

curzon

streaming now, while it’s still in cinemas

yellow for maybe
Joe: Nicolas Cage finally gets away from his shouty, cartoony madmen, but it’s hard to shake the sense that this was laboriously constructed around him as a showcase [my review] [Curzon on Demand]

Netflix

new to stream

green light
Lilo & Stitch: astonishingly lovely, tremendously moving, outrageously funny animated dramedy [my review] [Netflix]
green light
Thanks for Sharing: smart, pointed drama about addiction and its impact on addicts and those who love them, with excellent performances from Mark Ruffalo and Tim Robbins [Netflix]

bbciplayer

green light
In Darkness: The Diary of Anne Frank, only with sewers, in Nazi-occupied Poland; elegantly presented, chock full of moments of dreadful suspense [my review] [iPlayer] (expires in 6 days)
green light
Up in the Air: funny and smart and bitter and gently shocking; perfectly encapulates the self-delusion we’ve subjected ourselves to through the 2000s, and the quiet desperation we’ve lived with while living with that self-delusion [my review] [iPlayer] (expires in 5 days)


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