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artisanal film reviews | by maryann johanson

from Facebook: movies explain microaggressions


posted in:
easter eggs
  • Nathan

    Ah okay, I’ve heard some very vague explanations of this. I thought it was relating entirely to body language but it’s more just defining boarderline assault based on prejudice. Essencially behaviours that if they came from a singular source would be grounds for a harassment charge.

    As a white male I don’t have to deal with this sort of thing on a regular basis but as someone who was bullied in elementary school I can understand just how hurtful little jabs like this can be.

  • Jurgan

    What’s wrong with the sound in that video?

  • Isn’t The Gentleman’s Agreement basically all about this? (Willing to admit I could be wrong here).

  • It’s not just about physical assault. It’s also about making assumptions about people based on what they look like. It’s about not treating people like individuals.

  • How do you mean?

  • Nathan

    Well it seems to describe any actions motivated by prejudice that are only visible to those effected. I suppose a good example being the effect of fireworks on war vetrans. Something that may seem harmless to the general public but is deeply upsetting to a specific group.

  • Bluejay

    The fireworks analogy isn’t quite right, because it implies that as long as the veterans aren’t around, the activity actually *is* fun and harmless. But a statement like “I had no idea John was gay, he doesn’t do any of the gay things” is still insensitive and ignorant even if John isn’t in the room to hear it.

  • Bluejay

    Sometimes the microaggression becomes clearer when the tables are turned, and the microaggressor gets a taste of what it’s like.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMJI1Dw83Hc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1zLzWtULig

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9dt5SEiWHM

  • only visible to those effected

    If that’s the case, it is the result of ignorance. Perhaps willful ignorance.

    harmless to the general public but is deeply upsetting to a specific group

    And here’s a good example! What do you think makes someone part of “the general public” versus part of some “specific group”?

  • David

    Sweet! You PC bro?

  • Nathan

    In an alternate reality where Campus security is called to break up slam poetry night:

    “If you say a number followed by a statement meant to underline an issue or event in your life that’s more or less specific to you we will be forced to ask you to change up your free verse structure, or else!”

  • Nathan

    Buzzfeed is a blunt instrument, but they get the point across sometimes. I think the main problem is we’re so informal in western society (in certain countries more than others) that we boarder on rudeness. We should all just shut up sometimes and lurk more. At least, that’s my excuse for being withdrawn in public… heh.

  • Louisa

    Gentleman’s Agreement is a 1947 film starring Gregory Peck about an investigative reporter exposing subtle or unconscious anti-semitism among right-thinking WASP liberals.

  • I know what the film is about: I’ve reviewed it. I just don’t see how it connects to the concept of microagressions: it’s about overt and intentional discrimination. What am I missing?

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