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Dinner for Schmucks (review)

It’s not so much *Dinner for Schmucks* as it is *Waiting for Dinner for Schmucks.* You know, like *Waiting for Godot,* only in reverse. Because the schmucks start showing up right as the damn movie starts, and they never go away.

trailer break: ‘Everybody’s Fine’

Take a break from work: watch a trailer… It’s Planes, Trains and Automobiles, but sad (or sadder), and with Robert DeNiro. Hopefully not doing his crazy-dad Meet the Parents schtick. It looks like not, but you never know. Everybody’s Fine opens in the U.S. on December 4, and in the U.K. on February 19, 2010.

my week at the movies: ‘2012,’ ‘Women in Trouble,’ ‘The Strip,’ ‘A Single Man,’ ‘The Missing Person,’ ‘Nine,’ ‘Everybody’s Fine,’ ‘Serious Moonlight’

Woo-hoo! It’s the end of the world — again — as Roland Emmerich knows it, and I feel fine. Oh, there can be no question that this is crap, but will 2012 (opens in the U.S. and the U.K. on November 13) be glorious crap? I think it might be. I hope it might be. … more…

Easy Virtue (review)

If Noel Coward had written *Meet the Parents,* it might look something like this: witty and wise and totally lacking in poop jokes.

opening in the U.S. and Canada May 20-22: ‘Terminator Salvation,’ ‘Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian,’ ‘Dance Flick,’ more

opening wide Terminator Salvation: “Hello, my name is John Connor. You killed my father. Prepare to die.” Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian: Know what my favorite bit of inexcusably implausible nonsense here is? I adore how the floorplan for the high-security “federal archives” that supposedly exist (they don’t) under the Smithsonian on … more…

Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman (review)

Put Christopher Guest right on top of the list of They Who Can Do No Wrong. As if the recent DVD release and reappearance in theaters of This Is Spinal Tap weren’t enough for fans of his diverse talent and deadpan humor, he now bestows upon us Best in Show, another of the hilarious and poignant mockumentaries that, in the vein of his 1996 film Waiting for Guffman, poke gentle fun not only at their fictional subjects but at their real-life counterparts and movie audiences as well.