Tribeca ’03: The Event (review)

Gay men are dying under suspicious circumstances in Manhattan, and district attorney Parker Posey is determined to prosecute someone. When one AIDS sufferer (Don McKellar) meets his death by apparent suicide, Posey is on the case, and what she finds is indescribably heartbreaking and unexpectedly comforting. Set in Chelsea and shot on DV in downtown … more…

Tribeca ’03: Catch That Girl! (review)

It’s a nonstop action movie for kids, featuring an appealing gang of misfits led by the spunkiest 13-year-old girl since Pippi Longstocking, so of course it’s slated for a Hollywood remake. I’m glad I had the chance to see the Danish original before it gets watered down and prettied up and made boring and bland. … more…

Tribeca ’03: Risk/Reward (review)

With their intimate and compelling look at several powerful women in what is still the man’s world of high finance, Xan Parker and Elizabeth Holder demonstrate that even when discrimination isn’t holding women back, their own specially female fears and concerns do a fine job of competing with their drive and ambition. For these four … more…

Tribeca ’03: Cinemania (review)

If I ever worried that there might be something, you know, wrong with me and my passion for movies, I can now rest easy. Because this funny, sad film — by Angela Christlieb and Stephen Kijak — assures me that I am nothing but the greenest amateur compared to the cinemaniacs profiled here. Jack, Eric, … more…

Tribeca ’03: Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer (review)

In 1992, Brit Nick Broomfield’s Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer documented how the sensational media coverage of the woman who was supposedly America’s first female serial killer may have compromised her defense, how nearly everyone around her, from her mother to the police, was more interested in selling their stories to the … more…

Tribeca ’03: Confection (review)

A brief and sweet slice of New York City street life, with whipped cream on top, from filmmaker Eva Saks. A little girl, Amanda (Blaire Restaneo), having agonized over a bake shop full of delectable goodies, carries her treat proudly as she walks with her mother (Orlagh Cassidy) near Central Park, jealously protecting the confection. … more…

Tribeca ’03: Cane Toad (review)

Cane toads are an object lesson in not fooling with Mother Nature: Introduced into Australia in the hopes that they’d eat a pesky beetle that was destroying sugar cane crops, the toads instead became pests themselves. Now, David Clayton and Andrew Silke’s deliciously sick and twisted animated film gives these much maligned critters a voice … more…