added screening: ‘Coraline’

Oops, this popped up so quickly I didn’t even have time to get psyched for it. I just heard about a screening tomorrow of Coraline (opens in the U.S. on February 6, and in the U.K. on May 15), and of course I jumped on it. Neil Gaiman done up Nightmare Before Christmas style with … more…

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town, The Year Without a Santa Claus, Rudolph’s Shiny New Year (review)

Are they puppets? Are they some sort of clay-animated figures? Or are they some kind of beasts hitherto unknown and the likes of which the world has not seen again since? It doesn’t matter. The creatures Rankin & Bass brought to life in their animated holiday specials are so much a part of my psyche that I no more think about their nature than I pause to consider what constitutes the air I breathe.

The Princess Bride (review)

To avoid the first Classic Blunder, you should: A. Never go up against a Sicilian when death is on the line; B. Never get involved in a land war in Asia; C. Never utter a line from The Princess Bride unless you want to be spouting quotes all day

The Nightmare Before Christmas (review)

Some fans and critics have suggested that Edward Scissorhands is Tim Burton’s most personal film, that that artistic, outcast lost boy is a stand-in for Burton himself. I suspect this might even be true. But if Edward is Burton’s conscious reflection of himself, then I have a gut feeling that The Nightmare Before Christmas may be the movie closest to Burton’s subconscious. This Edward Gorey phantasm of a film, I think, is Burton’s id come to life.