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biast | by maryann johanson

Oscar Best Picture winners 1970–1989







Best Picture 1989: Driving Miss Daisy


Driving Miss Daisy is a bittersweet drama about the unspoken friendship between an unlikely pair over a quarter of a century. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1988: Rain Man


Beneath Rain Man’s gentle odd-couple comedy is a sharp drama about emotionality, frustration, and the capacity we all have for surprising ourselves by changing. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1987: The Last Emperor


Bernardo Bertolucci’s gorgeous and seductive The Last Emperor imbues a powerless and constantly thwarted figure with a resolute if melancholy grace. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1986: Platoon


Never has the chaos and horror of battle been so in-your-face, so personal, as in Oliver Stone’s Platoon. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1985: Out of Africa


Out of Africa is both a love letter to a lost world and a paean to one woman’s luxurious indulgence of her quest for independence and adventure. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1984: Amadeus


Amadeus is at once tragic and heartbreaking, joyful and raunchy. The magnificent, passionate music alone makes it worth watching. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1983: Terms of Endearment


Terms of Endearment perfectly captures the conflicting emotions of the love/hate relationship between mothers and daughters. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1982: Gandhi


One of the most ambitious biographical films ever made, Gandhi encompasses not just more than half a century of one man’s life but also one country’s struggle for independence. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1981: Chariots of Fire


Chariots of Fire is quite possibly the most lyrical, most spiritual sports movie ever made. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1980: Ordinary People


Ordinary People, Robert Redford’s directorial debut, is a talky drama about people who can’t talk to one another. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1979: Kramer vs. Kramer


He’s absent; she’s silent — they’re a match made for divorce attorneys in Kramer vs Kramer. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1978: The Deer Hunter


The Deer Hunter is a lyrical, slow-to-unfold story of the devastating effects of a tour in Vietnam on three close friends. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1977: Annie Hall


Not that it isn’t funny — even hilarious at times — but Annie Hall is little more than a series of sketches skewering self-involved, intellectual, professional New Yorkers. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1976: Rocky


This tender movie, on the surface about the most violent of sports, is really a romance about two lonely people reaching out to each other. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1975: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest


One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest doesn’t turn mental illness or mere oddity into something ennobling. It just shows us the stark reality of those who run far afield of the herd. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1974: The Godfather: Part II


The Godfather: Part II tells a story of immigrants in America that — minus the felonies and murders — many Americans might recognize as tales our grandparents told. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1973: The Sting


From the flawless performances all round to the clever script, The Sting is movie magic that approaches a kind of wizardry. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1972: The Godfather


Francis Ford Coppola’s riveting generational saga of the mob in New York City is steeped in loyalty to family, and at the same time demonstrates how dangerous too-close family ties can be. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1971: The French Connection


The French Connection is Patient Zero in Hollywood’s epidemic of blood, guts, and mayhem, the Typhoid Mary that spread gunplay, car chases, and psychotic cops throughout filmdom. Read the review…




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Best Picture 1970: Patton


Patton is a spectacular and unvarnished look at a man who thrives in war while also sowing the seeds of his own downfall. Read the review…




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