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cultural vandal | by maryann johanson

Spike TV ad dudes think women are disembodied tits…

…and that that’s what men want.

Bitching about this Entourage ad campaign is part of my just-posted Week in Women column, but I thought it was worth repeating here, because of the coincidence that ads from the campaign have begun showing up at FlickFilosopher.com.

I’ve been seeing ads like this one all over New York City over the last few weeks: on subway platforms, on the sides of buses, on the few telephone kiosks left in Manhattan. And they have been driving me bonkers. I carried my camera with me when I was out for the evening in Manhattan on Friday night, hoping to snap an image of one of them, because I knew I wanted to include it in The Week in Women this week and I couldn’t find an example online. No such luck, however: I didn’t come across one of the ads where I could safely take a picture.

And then, lo and behold, the ads start showing up here on Saturday morning. Perfect!
Here’s my problem with these ads: The basic-cable network Spike is going to start running Entourage next week — presumably with major cuts and bleeps to accommodate the delicate FCC-mandated sensibilities of commercial television — and they want everyone to know that this means that

now every guy can get some

I’ve fantasized about cornering a Spike ad exec — I imagine he’d be a sleek, slick asshole who fancies himself God’s gift to women — and asking him, in all pretend innocence, “Get some what?” And I’d love to hear his explanation. Would he actually say: “Tits”? “Ass”? “Booty”? “Poontang”? “Snatch”? Would he actually admit that his ad is intended to liken watching this show with getting laid by the hottest pair of disembodied breasts a horny lonely dude can imagine?

I’m not sure which makes me more angry: the fact that this ad reduces women to body parts that men like, or that some TV viewers will actually be seduced by this.

(Why haven’t I turned the ads off? Well, it’s the attitude behind the ad that is offensive, not the visual itself… unlike the Evony ads I wrote about this summer, or the new Evony ads I turned off just this week that were even more obnoxious. If I turned off every ad that was backed up by an loathsome philosophy, I’d really be limiting myself. Though I’ll repeat what I said recently: If there ever comes a time when I don’t need to rely on ad revenue from this site, I promise to turn all the ads off.)



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