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part of a small rebellion | by maryann johanson

Romeo & Juliet Get Married (review)

It’s one joke that goes on way too long: these modern-day starcrossed lovers (Luana Piovani and Marco Ricca) are Brazilians separated by an insurmountable divide: they are fans of rival soccer teams. It’s genetic, apparently; children inherit the fandom of their parents, so of course their families are mortal enemies. It’s probably a foreign thing, the humor about how parents will disavow their offspring who marry across football lines — perhaps this is wacky fun in South America or anywhere that is mad for the sport. But even I, who hail from the land of generational Yankees-versus-Mets contention, found this a tedious extrapolation of the already typically tedious genre of romantic comedy. What’s worse, the title gives away the ending: it’s not like Romeo and Juliet get married in Act One and then have to deal with the ramifications of that throughout the rest of the movie. No: this is pretty much exactly Shakespeare’s story, except with soccer hooliganism instead of murder. Extras include commentary by director Bruno Barreto and the cast (it’s subtitled), making-of featurette, cast and crew interviews, and more. [buy at Amazon]

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MPAA: not rated

viewed at home on a small screen

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  • PaulW

    Spoken like someone who doesn’t have any relatives who have a stake in the Alabama/Auburn college football rivalry. Trust me, sports fans and sports families can get that obsessive.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Well, I have a degree in Film, Culture and Communications from Queen’s University (1986) and have traveled and lived in different parts of the world and made some films too… I recently saw Romeo and Juliet Get Married with an audience of mostly Indians in New Delhi at a Brazilian Film Festival here and I have to admit, I along with the audience started to chuckle and laugh outrageously throughout this excellent film… I think the FlickFilosopher.com DVD Reviewer above has no international education and experience being basically a stay at home reviewer of the small screen in America… she obviously misses out on the international football rivalry and humour that goes with planting this right into Shakespeare. I did not mind the pace or level of insanity building in the story as it reaches its climax or that my curiosity was tipped off by the English translation film title – It still provided a major twist on the play and story and I am still laughing weeks later because of this film and its effect on a foreign audience together in the dark uncontrollably laughing our guts out and shedding tears of joy! Definitely worth watching and sharing with friends and family! I wish this director would redo all of Shakespeare in the same style!

  • James M. K. Stuart

    I totally agree with you Paul having seen this film in 2018 in India with an audience of Indians at a Brazilian Film Festival in New Delhi… this film has universal appeal for anyone who loves Shakespeare, understands sports rivalries and/or international football!

  • Bluejay

    Well, I have a degree in Film, Culture and Communications from Queen’s University (1986)

    Congratulations. We’re all very impressed, I’m sure.

    I think the FlickFilosopher.com DVD Reviewer above has no international education and experience being basically a stay at home reviewer of the small screen in America

    And with all your travel and culture and education, you apparently don’t even know how to do basic research by clicking on her “About” bio page before making your lazy assumptions. Good job there.

  • being basically a stay at home reviewer of the small screen in America

    LOL. You couldn’t possibly be more wrong. But thanks for playing!

  • James M. K. Stuart

    I think one could question your motives upon reading your review of this film done by yourself watching it on DVD at home in which you trash the story/production which may appeal to an more cultural international audience who understands international football and intense insane rivalries (like in Brazil or for that matter, India) than a US domestic audience could… there is a huge opportunity for humour here especially when the sports rivalry story is placed directly into Shakespeare for additional humour and added plot twists… it was not hard for a varied group of a large Brazilian Film Festival audience (of mostly Indians) in New Delhi to contagiously laugh as the story progressed. I was personally intrigued by the film’s title that I made sure to see this film for its enigmas posed by its very title – to find out just how the Shakespeare play has come in the 21st century! There are several 100 more than satisfied sophisticated viewers that night who beg to differ politely with your verdict on our cherished comedic movie! They all voted with their laughter and claps!

  • James M. K. Stuart

    I mentioned about my film studies and filmmaking background as a way to introduce myself and not meant to intimidate or puff up my ego… I am first time posting here on this service and therefore not fully understanding all of its features yet (frankly, I never will – how many people ever read their VCR manuals before setting the clock from a flashing 12:00 and inserting a video?!)… I did however read that the FlickFilosopher.com DVD Reviewer (MaryAnn Johanson) watched the film from home so I assumed with no live laughing theatre audience like I just did in New Delhi at a Brazilian Film festival retrospective aimed at Indians here who just loved this film maybe more than most films they have seen! New Delhi gets all kinds of films around the world and has consolates and embassies and cultural festivals of all kinds… It is an intelligent audience here!

  • Bluejay

    You have just established that different people can have different responses to a movie, and that a reviewer expressing her own opinion on a film does not control or dictate how other audiences might feel about it. Congratulations on such a stunning discovery.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    You have established that like the reviewer, you choose to be cynical about international cinema and great works of art and comedy… maybe for kicks or something?!

  • it was not hard for a varied group of a large Brazilian Film Festival audience (of mostly Indians) in New Delhi to contagiously laugh as the story progressed

    Did I say that it was?

    beg to differ politely

    Beg to differ all you want. I stand by my opinion.

  • you choose to be cynical about international cinema

    I will politely suggest that you should read more than one review of “international cinema” by me before you decide that I’m cynical about it!

    and great works of art and comedy

    Dude, you know that that’s just your opinion, right? This characterization of yours is not an objective, irrefutable fact about the film.

    What on earth did they teach you about art at Queen’s University?

  • not fully understanding all of its features yet

    Now I think you’re having us on. You’re unfamiliar with how comments work on the Internet?

    Indians here who just loved this film maybe more than most films they have seen!

    What are you, a mind reader? There is no way in hell you could POSSIBLY know such a thing.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    I understand basic internet communication but each service has its own features – so that I have yet to explore.

    I did an ‘informal’ survey after the film was over with the audience chatting about what they had just seen in the festival and they are people who tend to attend many cultural, artistic and diplomatic events here in New Delhi – the centre of South Asia region as a whole for life in this part of the world. People were laughing and joyous coming out of this screening and had nothing but praise for the production, its director and cast. There were no negative or cynical responses with this large audience. People were in a jovial uplifted mood!

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Look MaryAnn Johanson, if you can’t find genuine humour in this superb and artistic film – a film I would be happy to see again with the likes of the South African classic, “The Gods Must Be Crazy” or the Marx Brothers “Duck Soup”, then you really have a cynical and jaded edge to your reviewing approach that is counter productive to the profession of assisting others searching for good well made world cinema… I learned a lot at Queen’s University in Philosophy and History before I did a four year honours in Film & Media… I also was accepted at NYU for an MFA and attended there briefly (too expensive) and at UCLA and I was short listed at AFI at 24 years old for my animation award winning film at the time… I worked briefly with NBC and ABC in the movie-of-the-week productions both in Toronto and LA besides making some award winning short documentaries and corporate videos etc. Yes, I learned a lot at Queen’s and am glad this left wing department survived in a right wing university… many great film people have emerged from its small beginnings and today, it is thriving in new facilities at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts at Queen’s. It has an even brighter future with the blessing of its Alumni who gather annually to share memories of the good times we all seemed to have had there.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Your shallow review had little if nothing positive to say about this film… yet the large screening I attended a few weeks ago had the whole auditorium unable to control their laughter as the story progressed and things got more out of hand for the characters in the film… I think each of us in the audience was positively affected by the act of watching this artistic and comedic event both from within the film and from within the auditorium from the audience unable to control themselves any longer… hard to get this watching a DVD by yourself quickly to do a review where you may have many more to skim over and criticise before giving the “skip it” vote as in “Nero Thumbs Down”… such power to the critic reviewer who can twist the world in his or her hands and change destiny for the fate of quality international cinema… Must be a real rush vetoing artistic breakthroughs like “Romeo and Juliet Get Married”… but if Shakespeare were alive to see the film today with a sophisticated audience like I did, I think he would have done a “Thumbs Up” big time!

  • Bluejay

    I understand basic internet communication but each service has its own features – so that I have yet to explore.

    Ah, I see. And some internet services require that you state your educational credentials to boost your credibility. A perfectly understandable assumption.

    I did an ‘informal’ survey after the film was over with the audience… There were no negative or cynical responses with this large audience.

    Wow, that’s impressive, that you were able to speak to each and every single audience member. It’s also impressive that they gave you a universally positive response — of course, people in South Asia are always brutally honest in expressing their opinions in social/cultural gatherings, and they never mask their opinions in polite little white lies to make other people feel better.

    But all this is beside the point, you see. The point is that art is subjective, and one person may dislike what another person loves. You love this film, and you claim the audience whom you saw it with loved it too. Fine. But MaryAnn didn’t, and she can only write about HER perspective. She is not wrong to do so, as all opinions about art are subjective; she’s entitled to hers, as you are entitled to yours. But you’re certainly coming across as a patronizing jerk for INSISTING that she is wrong, and that you are right because of your plethora of academic degrees. (It also makes you look ridiculously insecure.)

    You should be satisfied that you personally enjoyed the film, but you seem really distressed that a stranger on the internet doesn’t agree with you. Why is that?

  • James M. K. Stuart

    First, Bluejay: Have you actually seen the film in question ever and if so did you see it alone or in a small group of like-minded friends/colleagues or even better in a Brazilian Film Festival in a completely different part of the world with an audience of diplomats and scholars and ordinary folk – and did you have a chance to observe their reactions during the screening and afterwards informally as I did? Or are you just coming to the rescue of MaryAnn Johanson for her rather hatchet job review of something that really deserves careful understanding?

    I don’t often give my opinion on films on various websites – but I was so impressed with this film coming from the Festival in New Delhi a few weeks ago that I tried to find an English speaking review about it and I hope to also somehow buy a copy of the film and show it to others. I was literally shocked to see MaryAnn Johanson’s negative review and “Skip it” recommendation… I felt I should respond and defend this artistic and comedic tour-de-force from Brazil as it was hugely successful with the audience in India recently. I felt I should introduce myself and some of my background as it relates to film and media – not to be egotistical – but to explain that I have seen an extensive amount of films from Canada, Hollywood, Bollywood and many other parts of the world… that I for one, respect and love well made cinema wherever it is made… and yes, I have seen a lot of Film and TV and Media that is below par and crap – but it is also necessary to make a lot of media to create the gems that stand universally for the rest of time. “Romeo and Juliet Get Married” deserves positive recognition and screen time in theatres and at home on as big a screen as one can get with others to see it. For me, it ranks up there with the classics of comedy and romantic comedy from world cinema.

  • Bluejay

    You keep missing my point. It’s irrelevant whether I’ve seen the film and what I think of it, because this isn’t about the film itself; it’s about YOUR myopic insistence that the film merits only ONE correct response (yours) and that it can only be properly seen in a specific context, with specific cultural knowledge, in the company of a specific group of people. You have made your love for the film abundantly clear, and no one is denying you that. It is YOU who are insisting that anyone who feels differently is doing a “hatchet job” on the film. Why are you unable to tolerate perspectives that differ from yours?

    I’m a longtime reader of this site and I’ve occasionally disagreed with MaryAnn’s reviews; I’ve loved some films and TV shows that she’s disliked, and disliked some films that she’s loved. We discuss our disagreements, but I never accuse her of being cynical or jaded or attack her as doing a disservice to film criticism. This is because I understand that our responses to art are all subjective, that her job as a critic is to write honestly about HER response to the film, which may or may not align with my own, and that this is perfectly fine. A point that you apparently refuse to accept.

    And I’m not “coming to the rescue” of anyone. MaryAnn is more than capable of speaking for herself. But this is a public forum where anyone can chime in, and I’m speaking for MYself in criticizing your comments.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Bluejay: If you are defending the only reviewer so far on FlickFilosopher.com (MaryAnn Johanson) for her right to her views, and your right to yours – I can agree to a point – but in my view one would at least have to see the film in question somehow and with an open mind first. You may not it seems bothered to even see this film and yet you like taking sides in ignorance just to put up a fight. Such is the ignorance in the internet age and utter laziness today! You called me lazy for expressing my views which were not just subjective but based on a lifetime of film criticism and filmmaking and study of world cinema and I watch films pretty carefully before I weigh in pro or con… You don’t seem to bother with a process that would allow at least a more fair trial for a given film. So we are in disagreement on many things here.

  • Bluejay

    If you are defending the only reviewer so far on FlickFilosopher.com (MaryAnn Johanson)

    In case it isn’t clear to you, MaryAnn is the ONLY reviewer on this site because it is HER site, which she owns and operates. MaryAnn IS the Flick Filosopher. If you’re talking about “ignorance and utter laziness,” perhaps you should apply that to yourself, since you haven’t bothered to find out anything about this reviewer or this site.

    You called me lazy for expressing my views

    No, I called you lazy for a different reason. Read my comment again.

    Again, I have no problem with your view on the film; I have a problem with how you’re insistently attacking someone for holding a different view. Frankly, if you’re having this much trouble grasping the nuance of my argument, I don’t have very much confidence in your judgment of cinema.

    my views which were not just subjective but based on a lifetime of film criticism and filmmaking and study of world cinema

    Dude, a lifetime of film criticism and filmmaking and study don’t make you less subjective. We are ALL subjective. How a film affects others is no less valid than how it affects you. I’m astonished that after your long study and career, you haven’t grasped this very basic principle of arts criticism. Maybe you should ask Queen’s University for a refund.

    You don’t seem to bother with a process that would allow at least a more fair trial for a given film.

    A fair trial HAS been given: MaryAnn watched the film, formed an opinion on it, and wrote about it. You have a different opinion, which is fine. The fact that her opinion doesn’t match yours does not make it unfair.

    So, are you ready to move on with your life now?

  • Well, that settles it, then. If a group of people you spoke to all loved the film, it’s literally impossible for anyone else to not love it. Your reasoning is impeccable.

  • if you can’t find genuine humour in this superb and artistic film

    If you cannot comprehend that this is only your subjective take on the film, and not one that other subjective takes will agree with, I have no idea what to say to you.

  • Your shallow review had little if nothing positive to say about this film…

    So?

    such power to the critic reviewer who can twist the world in his or her hands and change destiny for the fate of quality international cinema…

    Your hyperbole is hilarious.

    Clearly, I am not the critic for you. There are literally thousands of other film critics online. Go find one who matches your taste in film.

  • a Brazilian Film Festival in a completely different part of the world with an audience of diplomats and scholars and ordinary folk

    Yes, I’m sure we’re all terribly impressed with your world travels and the important people you hobnob with.

    Shall all us plebes simply refrain from watching any films at all unless we are certain that the experience will measure up to your high standards?

    I presume you never watch films at home, alone, or if you do, you do not put any store in your own reaction to them. After all, you didn’t watch it at a Brazilian Film Festival in a completely different part of the world with an audience of diplomats and scholars and ordinary folk, so what possible value could your response actually have?

    I suppose my extensive experience as a film critic and consumer of films from all over the world isn’t as worthy as your experience. How sad for me.

  • Tonio Kruger

    Over the years, I have come to the conclusion that when most people on the Internet ask you to give such-and-such movie “a fair trial,” what they really mean is “keep watching it over and over again until you come to have the exact same opinion about it that I do.”

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Bluejay: As I am new to this site and format, I did not know that MaryAnn Johanson is the only reviewer allowed on this site. I find that news somewhat distressing for people everywhere to get balanced and as objective as possible reviews of the pros and cons of any given film, including Romeo and Juliet Get Married, the film in question here.

    I am wondering if you, Bluejay, are just a friend of MaryAnn’s or are also paid for your enforcing of her views when you feel like doing so, even when you have never even seen the film in question! To me the format between you and MaryAnn on this site seems like a 1-2 punch gang up on anyone who dares to hold a different view than yours or hers. Granted you and MaryAnn must disagree on films you have both seen and felt the need to comment on, but in this case with this film in question – it would seem like you are a hired gun to attack anyone who decides to venture some comments on the site. I can’t think of a more lazy way to attack other people’s views on films… skip seeing the film and just second MaryAnn’s “Skip It” or “Thumbs Down, Nero!” recommendation!

    Bluejay: I don’t instantly attack anyone for the ego boost or joy factor… I only very rarely in my life have even done internet film reviews for anyone to discuss. Of course I always hope that people would get off their butt and actually see the film in question before weighing in on any side of the debate or giving their view. Seems too logical and ethical to you, Bluejay and maybe also to MaryAnn who needs some quick boostering from people like you to sell her positions to the public on a given film she chooses to review…

    Bluejay (the ‘Dude with no ethics or logic’) decides to lecture me on university studies he probably never did… I am very familiar with the Arts and Sciences and did pre-Engineering and worked with engineers and Ph.D researchers in a high tech firm for 11 years operating as a Communications Manager. I am well aware that all people are subjective even if they are steeped in the scientific method, etc. and that Social Sciences and the Arts / Humanities are less objective than what science purports to be. I studied philosophy, history, art, film, culture, communications, media, psychology, world religions along my path to today. So it has been an evolutionary process. And yes, Bluejay Dude, there is a big difference in quality of responses and interactions and critical thinking as one gathers a varied education over decades of living and working and experiencing life. There is and always has been a big difference between just ‘an opinion’ and gathering ‘an informed opinion’… Unfortunately, the masses are dumbed down by the elites who run the system to control the people. It would be nice to evolve each person’s consciousness but that requires each person to get off their butt and not be lazy, to invest in an education and life experiences that are quality time and space. Most people are too lazy and prefer to be manipulated and that is sad for them and for all of society and the world.

    There is very little fair about the format of MaryAnn’s website or her reviews as echoed by you, Bluejay, who has not even bothered to see the film in question here but rather act as a hatchet master to attack anyone who ventures onto the site and questions the motives of the only official and sanctioned reviewer, MaryAnn Johanson! Sounds like a process that needs to be overhauled for ethical and logical reasons and for practical reasons to actually get the best reviews out to the people about the best films and, for that, you would need several more reviewers of different backgrounds with equal power to MaryAnn Johanson. Then “the subjective swamp” you folks live in could see the light of day and be a bit more objective for an innocent audience wishing to find good value in quality films from world cinema – past, present and future.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    So, MaryAnn Johanson, the only sanctioned reviewer of this site, you seem happy with the power and control vested in you solely to deliver reviews on any film you choose and would have trouble in other people commenting and criticising your approach that you need to “hire” or lean on a friend like “Bluejay” to lap on praise for you and be an attack dog to any other commentator you don’t agree with or like… sounds like you suffer from fear of criticism yet you are supposedly running an open forum website about film reviews and comments from the general public! Sounds like you are feeling threatened that some film goers will see the film in question with an audience of some size, maybe in a theatre, at a festival, in another country than the good ol’ USA… sounds like you are a bit of a control freak yourself and would have trouble with a film jury weighing in on a film’s worth at a Festival but the jury needs to be allowed to express itself fair and free on your website and be unhindered by hired guns like Bluejay who don’t even bother to see the damn film in question but think they can arrogantly attack those who have more credentials than he does and those who took the time to see the film and see how a real audience responded to it in the field of life! It sounds like your website for reviewing needs to become far more objective in approach, in structure and style to attempt to be fair and free to the world at large who are the potential audience for any given film, including “Romeo and Juliet get Married”! I am sure your style and approach has caused other good films to suffer and fall by the way side… someday, I might read some more of your reviews to get a better impression of your approach here, but so far, you and I totally disagree on the quality of the film experience with “Romeo and Juliet Get Married” – It is a in top form as Farce and Satire and Comedy and Romantic Comedy… there are many other great films from all over the world and in the USA that would also qualify for this type of genre as very noteworthy too. Let us not throw the baby out with the bathwater by saying to the general public, “Skip It!” or Thumbs Down, Nero!” when you could do so much better by allowing people the courtesy of being open minded so they will be curious to discover this gem of a film for themselves. Thank you for your consideration, despite our differences and approaches here.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Your one word reaction – “So?” speaks volumes as to the the approach and attitude you take toward film… You and I are very different maybe because I have more formal training and have made films myself working on all the roles to start with and then developing projects and budgets that could afford to have a cast and crew and more production and post-production values… I learned at queen’s and afterwards to work on projects with minimal means and I see the merit in world cinema projects that are not trying to be super big Hollywood or super big Bollywood films/movies. I tend to honour and like the smaller authentic world cinema films and filmmakers over the glossy hyped synthetic over-produced corporatism-controlled bland products… I don’t know where you stand on any of this except by your flat rejection of this quality Brazilian work of art and comedy, Romeo and Juliet Get Married. I think your rejection shows a trait you have and a strong bias against independent world cinema, but you say you have liked other films of world cinema – so I await to see your other reviews. thanks for your time and attention to my comments and interest here.

    Yes, you and I are very different in our approaches to film and likely our purpose and mission and vision for cinema worldwide. But I do have an open mind (believe it or not) and I look forward when I find time to read your other reviews. Of course, I do wish you would upgrade your comments and rating for “Romeo and Juliet Get Married” so that other people might consider the film to buy and watch.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    MaryAnn Johanson: Please read my latest comments to your enforcer/friend/hired gun “Bluejay” about subjective and objective standards as found in the Arts and social Sciences and Sciences… I tend to agree that even scientists are subjective in their views – having studied pre-engineering and been a Communications Manager for 11 years with engineers and Ph.D. scientist/R & D types… but also grappled with the quest of social sciences and more recently the arts / Humanities to be more objective and scientific…

  • Bluejay

    MaryAnn Johanson is the only reviewer allowed on this site

    Yes, for the same reason that I’m the only one allowed to use my email account. It’s HER PERSONAL WEBSITE.

    I didn’t bother with the rest of your comment. You’re either deliberately trolling or you’re exactly as fatuous and self-important as you seem. Either way I have better things to do with my day. You, clearly, don’t. Bye.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    It may be a better litmus test to have a large group of people of varied backgrounds from sophisticated to ordinary sit in a darkened auditorium and watch the film progress in front of them and to observe not just the film for its content, production values, script, direction, editing, camerawork, cast, etc. but also to observe the audience in their reactions to the film both during and afterwards as the laughed and chatted for some extended time… Of course, that quality of film going experience is hard to replicate by yourself when you have a stack of videos to comb over in fast forward/rewind and play mode on your VCR / DVD… popcorn not included.

  • James M. K. Stuart

    Bluejay Way: Do you get paid for your flippant responses or do you do them out of love for the sport of “the put down”? Just because MaryAnn Johanson has set up her website so she can be sole reviewer and controller, does not mean that it is carved in stone or law or ethics as a good idea or even visionary for making a better film-going experience for the world at large… She could quite easily restructure her website to have multiple reviewers – each with a different background from her… That would be a much more dynamic model and way to go forward… each reviewer could specialise in different aspects or areas of world cinema and they could overlap too. The market and audience suffers from having just one reviewer only and not getting other perspectives to consider per film review. Oh, Bluejay, no need to fly away when you could make more money not seeing any films and working for multiple reviewers in the new format! Ha!

  • Bingo.

  • You’re gone.

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