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die hard is a xmas movie | by maryann johanson

question of the day: Does anyone really trust celebrities?

This week Forbes magazine published its list of “The Ten Most Trusted Celebrites”. They’re talking about trust when it comes to marketing:

Consider this: Before his late November car crash, the world-class golfer was a marketer’s dream–a consummate professional on the course and guarded family man off. Brands from Nike and Accenture to Gillette and AT&T threw millions at his (seemingly) squeaky clean image. But as time has passed–and the laundry list of alleged mistresses has grown–many of Woods’ sponsors have suspended their campaigns, if not dropped him altogether.

So, consumers suddenly don’t “trust” Tiger Woods’ paid-for recommendation on sneakers or razors or cell phones because he likes to fuck blondes who aren’t his wife? How bizarre. If we’re going to “trust” celebrities merely because they’re famous, how could their behavior possibly have any impact on that “trust”? It’s not like Woods was lending his name to, say, a chain of drive-in marriage counselors.

The names that Forbes reports “Americans rated the highest in for trustworthiness, awareness and appeal” include names such as James Earl Jones and Tom Hanks. Even if it is all about basic perceptions, why on Earth would the voice of Darth Vader be trusted?

What the hell is this all about? Does anyone really trust celebrities?

(If you have a suggestion for a QOTD, feel free to email me. Responses to this QOTD sent by email will be ignored; please post your responses here.)



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