trailer break: ‘Scott Pilgrim vs. the World’

Take a break from work: watch a trailer…


I’ve been scolded already for not understanding the appeal of Scott Pilgrim, and I think I can pretty much promise those scolders that if this trailer is representative of the film, I will continue not to understand the appeal of it. Cuz it looks like yet another celebration of the Nice Guy(TM), the passive-aggressiveness doormat who constantly complains that women like only assholes and this is why he — the Nice Guy(TM) — is alone… while simultaneously reinforcing the notion that women really do only like assholes.

Guys: Why would you want to date someone with seven evil exes? Does this not call into question the judgment of such a woman, that she would have made so many bad calls when it came to relationships? Do you really want to be next?

Michael Cera is correct here: Seven evil exes is not “baggage.” It’s a reason to run away very fast.

But I guess, as usual, if the woman in question is hot enough, a guy will put up with anything. And men enjoy seeing themselves depicted this way, as poor saps who can be manipulated into anything?

I can’t wait to see this, to learn if I’m wrong about the movie. But even if I am, it’s being sold on this basis. Which is depressing enough.

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World opens in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. on August 13.

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JoshDM
JoshDM
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:34pm

I’ve never read the source material; I just heard that it is very very very very entertaining stuff, the sort of comic book that wins awards and critical praise, etc.

Maybe I should; I do read a lot of comics.

I do question the concept, though. Ramona Flowers better be worth all the trouble having to battle her evil exes, otherwise George Michael Bluth might be better off going for the more physically attractive (to me) and seemingly understanding girl sitting in the swings next to him.

JoshDM
JoshDM
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:35pm

I’m going to read the books before I see the film, but only if I can get the books on the cheap.

Tyler Foster
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:41pm

Actually, Scott Pilgrim is a doormat, and learns to be less of one through his love for Ramona and how he learns to fight for it. Or at least, this is what the comic book is about.

And Ramona has seven “evil exes” because she’s a runner, afraid of commitment in a different way than Scott, and she grows up as well. As a side note, her exes are not necessarily “evil” in that they are bad people. It is just a video game kind of construct in which Scott gleans something from each of her past relationships.

C David Dent
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:55pm

@TylerFoster

That’s a very concise description of the story. Bravo!

What’s more, Scott is sort of a “likable bum” who tramples on his friends in an endless series of clueless impositions that they tolerate. But eventually he begins to realize how much of a burden he is to them when they don’t allow him to do the same thing (cluelessly) to Ramona once they start dating.

I really enjoyed how it is portrayed as a video game with Scott “levelling up” from clueless kid to proper human adult.

Yep, the studio is marketing it as “same old same old” because that will sell but I trust Edgar Winter to do the story real justice.

I am reminded of how they studios marketed “The Invention of Lying” as a screwball magic/romantic comedy and it was so much better than that (as social commentary/satire).

C David Dent
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:56pm

Correction! Edgar Wright…I didnt’ realize what I had typed until I had submitted it

Drave
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 2:58pm

Yeah, what Tyler said. Since Scott is basically a doormat gamer geek, the story uses video game tropes as the language with which it communicates its ideas. He also isn’t just obsessed with her because she is hot. What the trailer doesn’t make clear is that Ramona is the girl of his dreams in a completely literal sense. As in, the moment he meets her, he recognizes her as someone who has been appearing in his dreams for quite some time. Her appearance in his waking life is the catalyst which causes him to try and “level up” to the point where he is actually worthy of the girl of his dreams.

PaulW
PaulW
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 3:04pm

Guys: Why would you want to date someone with seven evil exes?

Um, if she’s cute and likes video games, sure.

Let’s face it, the person we’re hooking up could very well have hundreds of poor dating choices stretching back to her/his pre-teen years even by the time we’re in college. And while some can question the wisdom of dating a girl who has Seven Evil Exes, it’s not necessarily *her* fault *they* are evil. We all make our own choices, after all. And good (and smart) girls have been trapped in bad relationships with evil guys before.

And the Exes don’t seem to be entirely evil, mind you. That one guy says to Romana (after tossing Scott into a stone building) “He seems nice.”

Try to view the film this way: it’s an American/Canadian version of the UK ubercult classic “Spaced” tv show… just without Simon Pegg and trading in the Star Wars references for Super Mario Bros (the game, not the movie).

And go to the nearest B&N store and look for the graphic novels! You might be impressed.

Tyler Foster
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 3:07pm

The flipside of what Drave posted is also what makes Ramona special: her magical bag full of giant hammers, her ability to use “subspace” in her job at Amazon.ca to rollerskate through people’s dreams, etc. She’s not just another pretty face, she’s awesome.

marshall
marshall
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 3:21pm

I am not sure I got the ‘nice guy’ complaining about being alone from this trailer. From the get go he went right up to her and started talking to her. That doesn’t seem to speak ‘door mat’ to me.

RyanT
RyanT
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:04pm

I have faith in Edgar Wright. That is all.

JT
JT
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:14pm

Never read the comic (although I’ve never heard anything but good things about it either). I admit that this trailer doesn’t do a whole lot to sell me on the story, but the visual style is pure awesome. The comic-book style sound effects, the video game style fight scenes (there’s another trailer out there where you actually see a combo-counter at one point)…it looks wonderfully geeky, and unlike anything else that I’ve ever seen in a movie. So I may wind up checking this one out.

Knightgee
Knightgee
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:24pm

Scott isn’t really a “nice guy” at the start of the series. He’s a bit of a bum, but he’s outgoing with girls and assertive and if anything is more likely to be the one inconveniencing those around him than to be used by those around him. It’s really sort of aggravating that the trailer is playing it off this way actually, as it would be nice to see Michael Cera play a different character for once.

Ben
Ben
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:34pm

George Michael Bluth might be better off going for the more physically attractive (to me) and seemingly understanding girl sitting in the swings next to him.

Yeah, except that I am pretty sure based on the reading that comics that the girl on the swings is his sister (Scott Pilgrim’s that is). A check of IMDB seems to confirm that.

As others have said, Scott Pilgrim isn’t a nice guy ™ he is a jerk – not that that will make it better for you I am sure, but for example SPOILER in the comic (and probably in the movie) he is dating an underage girl at the start of the story who he first two-times and then quite cruelly dumps for Ramona. END SPOILER

I have read all the comics so far, and I have to say I don’t like Scott very much as a character (although as others say, as the comics go on he levels up to become a better person). But the story is clever, and has others have said its references to nerd, video game, and comic culture are right in my sweet spot. I am looking forward to the movie for sure.

Ryan H
Ryan H
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:36pm

The comic story arc is definitely more of a ‘time to be a man, not a guy’ arc than a lovable-doofus arc. While nothing is fixed in stone in an adaptation I trust Write to not dumb it down.

Not sure if it’s on YouTube but the apple trailer site has a newer and longer trailer that feels a little more coherent.

Dominic
Dominic
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:51pm

It isn’t based in reality. It’s based in a world where people break into Street Fighters battles at the drop of a hat.

That being said, it is a coming of age story. The characters start out flawed and narcissistic, but eventually become aware of their flaws and learn to change themselves.

Tyler Foster
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 4:52pm

I didn’t even notice you posted the older trailer. Here’s the newer and much-better one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NUBVcit5VM

MaryAnn
MaryAnn
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 5:02pm

Scott Pilgrim isn’t a nice guy ™ he is a jerk

Nice Guys(TM) *are* jerks.

while some can question the wisdom of dating a girl who has Seven Evil Exes, it’s not necessarily *her* fault *they* are evil.

It’s *her* fault that she chooses them over and over again. If she hasn’t learned her lesson after, say, the third evil ex, she’s an idiot. She’s not “cute” — she’s deeply troubled.

Try to view the film this way: it’s an American/Canadian version of the UK ubercult classic “Spaced” tv show… just without Simon Pegg and trading in the Star Wars references for Super Mario Bros (the game, not the movie).

And without an equal female protagonist, such as the one *Spaced* has. At least, the trailer does not make it look as if there is one.

It isn’t based in reality.

That’s gonna be the excuse for this? *The Lord of the Rings* isn’t based in reality, either, but it *is* emotionally true. Even fantasies must say *something* that speaks to us.

Tyler Foster
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 5:16pm

She’s not “cute” — she’s deeply troubled.

Yes. And that gets worked out over the course of the books.

And she’s only 25. At least 3 of the “exes” were extremely brief flings, and not genuine relationships. It’s not like there’s some standard to which the “exes” are held to in order to qualify.

Tonio Kruger
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 6:19pm

One of the seven evil exes is a girl? Cool! ;-)

I never got the appeal of people who insist on dyeing their hair a color not normally found in humans their age but then this movie isn’t being made for me and unlike some people I can mention, it’s not necessary for me to fall in love with a character’s love interest to get involved in that character’s story provided that story is told well. (Just as well. The girl would be way too young for me.)

That said, it could have potential. Indeed, it’s worth remembering that Spaced didn’t seem all that promising at first–unless you’re the type of person which likes everything–and I mean everything, even BP stock certificates and Spice Girl records–British–and of course, I’m not that type of person.

So, we’ll see.

Chuck
Chuck
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 6:37pm

But I guess, as usual, if the woman in question is hot enough, a guy will put up with anything. And men enjoy seeing themselves depicted this way, as poor saps who can be manipulated into anything?

We are simple creatures are we not?

MaryAnn
MaryAnn
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 7:50pm

We are simple creatures are we not?

If men are such simple, hormonally driven creatures of base tastes and lusts, why are they in fucking charge of fucking everything? How can they possibly be trusted with their fingers on nuclear buttons and such if just one pair of tits walking by might distract them so badly that they’ll accidentally push that button? What if a random, unexpected hardon accidentally pushes the button? How can we trust men to do *anything* at all other than rut constantly?

JoshB
JoshB
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 8:20pm

What if a random, unexpected hardon accidentally pushes the button?

Isn’t that why pants were invented?

Knightgee
Knightgee
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 8:47pm

We are simple creatures are we not?

Speak for yourself.

char
char
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 8:52pm

i’m going to see it because it was filmed in my home town, Toronto. it’s nice to see the beautiful city i live in playing itself for a change. :)

JoshDM
JoshDM
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 9:08pm

Second trailer is much better than the one posted.

PaulW
PaulW
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 10:12pm

MaryAnn: there are female characters galore in the comic book and also the movie. The second trailer shows them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Scott_Pilgrim_characters

I hate to point this out, but the reason why there was a lot of flack about you ignoring this as a “need-to-see 2010 summer flick” from your Inception post is that A) there are a *lot* of fans of the books who are hyped about the movie and B) you haven’t read the source materials. I know that can be said about a lot of the movies you have to review, but in this case you really should go find a Scott Pilgrim graphic novel at a bookstore or library and just give it a quick read (I personally can’t say how quick it will go as I’m a fast reader, but Volume 1 took me an hour).

Here’s a link to the New York Public Library: they’ve got volumes 1-5, try vol.1 first.
http://catalog.nypl.org/iii/encore/record/C|Rb17252118|Sscott+pilgrim|P0%2C4|Orightresult?lang=eng&suite=pearl

PaulW
PaulW
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 10:20pm

If men are such simple, hormonally driven creatures of base tastes and lusts, why are they in fucking charge of fucking everything? How can they possibly be trusted with their fingers on nuclear buttons and such if just one pair of tits walking by might distract them so badly that they’ll accidentally push that button? What if a random, unexpected hardon accidentally pushes the button? How can we trust men to do *anything* at all other than rut constantly?

Because women are also hormonal and crazy? Not *exactly* like guys but just as bad?

/glances at MaryAnn’s obsessions with time-traveling Doctors visiting her boudoir to borrow a towel after taking hot showers

Yes, men are idiots who think with their Pocket Rockets. But women – which one was the CEO of Hewlett-Packard that ran it into the ground and is now running for the California Senate seat? – don’t exactly do any better. ‘Tis better to note that ALL humans are flawed/have issues and whatever the gender is doesn’t fully define what those flaws are.

MaryAnn
MaryAnn
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 10:26pm

MaryAnn: there are female characters galore in the comic book and also the movie. The second trailer shows them.

That second trailer doesn’t change my perception of what the film is going to be. I don’t see any significant female characters except the object of the male protagonist’s desire.

A) there are a *lot* of fans of the books who are hyped about the movie and B) you haven’t read the source materials.

So? Just because other people are psyched for this doesn’t mean I have to be. And if the movie cannot be appreciated without having read the source material, it will fail as a movie. As I’ve already said. That won’t change no matter how many times someone insists I *must* read the graphic novel.

MaryAnn
MaryAnn
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 10:29pm

Because women are also hormonal and crazy? Not *exactly* like guys but just as bad?

No! Because “women are hormonal and crazy” has been an excuse for a very long time for why women should not be allowed to do lots of things. But when men say that about themselves, we’re not supposed to believe the same about them?

/glances at MaryAnn’s obsessions with time-traveling Doctors visiting her boudoir to borrow a towel after taking hot showers

My obsession with *Doctor Who* does not rule my life and direct everything I do, which appears to be the point of guys who say things like “Men are simple creatures”: it’s offered as the explanation for everything that motivates men.

Prankster
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 11:01pm

You don’t see any significant female characters who aren’t Ramona? Did you somehow miss his female bandmate Kim Pine, his sister Stacey, and the female evil ex? They all have pretty obvious, prominent roles in the trailer. The comic has an abundance of female roles, and they all appear to be in the movie.

I think you’re seeing something that’s not there. I’m sorry that there are so many crappy or nonexistent roles for women out there, but Scott Pilgrim is the antidote to that, and you’re accusing it of being part of the problem based on a trailer you apparently didn’t even pay much attention to.

MaryAnn
MaryAnn
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 11:26pm

I see women in the trailer there to support Scott in his journey. I don’t see women on their own journey. I think you’re reading something into the trailer that may not be there. There may well be strong female characters in the source material. That doesn’t mean they ended up that way in the film.

I’ll be delighted to be wrong about this. But right now all any of us have to judge the movie on is that trailer. Including those of you who’ve read the source material.

PaulW
PaulW
Mon, Jun 14, 2010 11:55pm

So you’re not even going to glance at the graphic novel.

(thinks it over)

Your library card expired and you’re too ashamed to admit it, aren’t you? Well it’s nothing to be ashamed of, I needed to update my card last month. It’s really simple, just go to the circ desk, get them to reset the expiration date, and then just causally walk over to the YA section and check it out… (earnest thumbs up gesture) Support your local library!

amanohyo
amanohyo
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 12:07am

I picked up a volume of Scott Pilgrim once and couldn’t get past the crude art style and general lack of quality. After reading the plot summary on Wikipedia, I’m pretty happy with my decision. If you’re going to force me to look at amateurish art, I need something more than a hipster stream of consciousness soap opera sprinkled with out of context pop culture video game references.

If the relationship stuff at the core was more Scenes from a Marriage than slacker Saved by the Bell, I’d be tempted to take a closer look. Damn standards, getting in the way again. Eighteen year old me would have eaten it up though. Of course, eighteen year old me skipped class to play Samurai Shodown IV five hours a day.

Also: if you’re going to have martial arts in your movie, even goofy video game physics-ish martial arts, hire a martial artist. All the fancy effects, wires, cuts, and/or CG in the world cannot hide these actors’ complete and utter lack of grace.

amanohyo
amanohyo
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 12:53am

Hmm, I just skimmed one of the later books and a couple of the backgrounds aren’t completely amateurish. The content is still subpar. Persepolis has even more simplistic art, but it’s a stylistic choice that suits the content well. More importantly, the content is actually interesting and relevant, the setting is original, and the main character is compelling and fleshed out.

After reading a few pages, I don’t care whether Scott gets the girl of his dreams or not. He could explode into a shower of golden coins on the next page, never to return again, and I’d feel nothing. The pop culture references are not clever or funny in and of themselves. Yes, Clash at Demonhead and Kid Chameleon are games, and? Yes, a Bob-omb is an enemy in Mario 3, and so…? Yes, Young Neil backwards is Neil Young, aaaand therefore…? Just keep throwing those references out as fast as you can, and maybe no one will notice the puerile teen romance novel underneath it all.

I sure hope the movie is a heck of a lot better than the books.

Prankster
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 1:14am

OK, I stand corrected: this is the earlier teaser version of the trailer, rather than the longer version that just hit, in which we see the array of female characters. (Stacey’s still in the short trailer, though.)

It’s possible the movie is a major departure from the comics, but the second trailer looks VERY faithful to the source material, including whole lines and shots.

Ben
Ben
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 3:55am

[quote]Nice Guy(TM), the passive-aggressiveness doormat who constantly complains that women like only assholes and this is why he — the Nice Guy(TM) — is alone[/quote]

Ok, I will be more specific then. Scott Pilgrim is not the above Nice Guy (TM) which you defined. He is a selfish idiotic little boy but he has had no problem getting girls. He somewhat fit this TV Trope (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/JerkAss) with a bit of perhaps (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/JerkWithAHeartOfGold)

This is not of course a reason to watch the movie, just trying to point out that in your read on it’s plot is not accurate.

[quote]Even fantasies must say *something* that speaks to us.[/quote]

True, and those of us arguing that we are looking forward to Scott Pilgrim vs The World are trying to explain what does speak to us (as well as a bit of “you, person on the internet, you are wrong”). I think with just the trailers to go by (which to me have strong hints of his obnoxiousness as well as strong female characters, but the source material biases me) we are just going to have to agree to disagree :)

Ben
Ben
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 3:56am

nuts… oh I wish there was an edit button so I could add “block” to those quotes :D

Muzz
Muzz
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 4:30am

I’ve never read the book but there’s a certain resonance in the themes I’m seeing. I’ve even seen stats that say girls, on average, are way more adventurous and experienced than their male counterparts by their early twenties. Doubly so in the geeky end of things. This lines up nicely with life, in my humble experience, and a girl’s ‘past’ being represented as boss fights for the hero to measure up against is hilarious.
Sure it’s from the guy’s point of view, but I guess that’s built in. It’s just a matter of how they handle it. So we’ll see.

Anyway, can’t you still be a decent worthwhile human being despite failing in your choice of a mate seven times? It can take a while to get to know people. Maybe that’s the point of the story (if only I’d read it).

Bluejay
Bluejay
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 8:57am

Rock on, PaulW:

Support your local library!

With letters and donations, if possible. :-)

I read Volumes 1-5 a while back (has Vol. 6 come out?) and remember liking the story and the sensibility a whole lot. Don’t some of the female characters go on their own personal journeys too? I seem to recall Knives Chau’s feelings for Scott evolving over the course of the story. And I remember Ramona being fascinating in her own right, not just as the prize for the hero to win; the more we learn about her past, the more fully fleshed-out she seems.

…The movie does need to stand on its own, of course.

Tyler Foster
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 9:11am

I see women in the trailer there to support Scott in his journey. I don’t see women on their own journey.

Well, I maintain that Ramona should be a well-developed female lead, but out of curiosity, if the story is focused on a male hero, is there an inherent problem with women being there to support him, as long as they’re still well-written and intelligent? Scott goes to his younger sister for advice because she’s smarter than he is. Yeah, there are too many movies about heroes and too few about heroines, but that still seems like a positive, non-marginalized supporting role for a female character. A supporting role isn’t necessarily supposed to have much of an on-screen journey. She’s kind of like Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original trilogy, and it’s not like he gets tons of backstory.

JoshDM
JoshDM
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 10:37am

So you’re not even going to glance at the graphic novel.

I don’t think she is concerned about the source material. I figured it out from the Airbender comments.

She wants to be able to judge a film on its own merits; whether it delivers a story, not whether it properly delivers the story of the source material on which it is based.

Granted, the source materials for Scott Pilgrim and Airbender (not to mention Watchmen and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) are quite entertaining in a geeky way (I’m assuming in the case of Pilgrim), and probably (definitely in the case of Watchmen and LXG) lose much of what made them great when adapted to the big screen.

This is why we, as fans, want MAJ to check out the source materials. We saw LXG. We know that NOT ONE PERSON picked up the completely unrelated graphic novel after watching that tripe.

I found Airbender (the cartoon) to be a very engaging show, and the problem is going to be when someone who hasn’t seen the source cartoon watches the live action adaptation, they are NOT going to WANT to see the (placing bets now) higher quality source. And that is “tragic”. The viewer loses.

(By “tragic”, I mean in a minor sense; not “tragic” like the BP oil spill).

In the same sense, having been burned before, those who have read the Scott Pilgrim comic source material want Geek Reviewer MAJ to read it, and are nervous that the adaptation won’t hold up to the source (it never does) an MAJ would never end up reading it.

It’d be like someone who has never heard of Douglas Adams watching the “recent” Hitchhiker’s Guide movie and then deciding it is not worth it to read the book series because the adaptation was so crappy.

That last sentence right there; that is what we who know the source material fear.

JoshDM
JoshDM
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 10:46am

Speaking of which, let’s TRAVEL BACK IN TIME FIVE YEARS and read the review which is prefaced by someone’s endearing love for the source material (and blatant expression and explanation of bias – an excellent advertisement for the source material), and followed-up with utter disappointment in the resulting adaptation.

And now I pose the question.

MAJ, after (or even before because we all saw the trailers) watching Hitchhikers, did you feel you need to defend the novel to those who saw the film but never read the books?

Because I believe that is how many of my fellow commenters who have read Scott Pilgrim or watched Airbender are feeling right now.

Tonio Kruger
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 11:17am

Well, it’s worth noting that contempt for or ignorance of the source material doesn’t always mean contempt for the movie version of said source. Just note the many critics who looove Coppola’s The Godfather but hate the Mario Puzo novel which inspired it. Or who loves Brian DePalma’s Carrie but hate the Stephen King novel that inspir–you get the point.

Nor does that formula automatically change in respect to comic books. Not everyone who likes The Mask liked the original comic book series which inspired it. Indeed, I suspect many of that film’s fans weren’t even aware it was based on a comic book. And it’s the same story with Men in Black. Or the X-Men series.

There are no doubt many Blade fans who had no idea that the character originally debuted in an old Marvel comic book–and wasn’t even considered a major character for much of that book’s run. Indeed, few of that comic’s fans would have predicted back in the 1970s that Blade would be the one character in that book who would prove to be a huge hit with non-comic fans–much less the title character in a series of hit movies.

And, of course, familiarity and affection for the original source material doesn’t always guarantee you’ll also like the actual movie. After all, some Alan Moore fans liked the movie version of Watchmen. Some did not. Some Moore fans liked the movie version of V for Vendetta. Some did not.

And people who read portions of the original Spirit were often more disgusted with the recent movie version than people who had never heard of Denny Colt and had no idea why he was supposed to be so special.

PaulW
PaulW
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 3:34pm

@Tonio, very wise words.

Okay, so if you don’t want to read the graphic novels, MaryAnn, can you at least go to the local library and read “Road Dogs” by Elmore Leonard? It’s a follow-up to “Out of Sight”…

…what? I’m just trying to drum up business for libraries over here…

Tonio Kruger
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 6:27pm

@ PaulW. Thank you, PaulW.

PaulW
PaulW
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 7:13pm

And the pity of all this wailing and gnashing of teeth? We’re overlooking the horrifying possibility that The Hobbit is gonna get directed by Brett “Hey, Joel, can I borrow that Batsuit with the nipples?” Ratner.

http://movies.ign.com/articles/109/1097884p1.html

JoshB
JoshB
Tue, Jun 15, 2010 9:01pm

@PaulW

No, not even Hollywood is that dumb. I’m not worried about it. Nope, not at all…

hdj
hdj
Wed, Jun 16, 2010 12:28am

this movie looks bout as entertaining as a vagina dentata

Nate
Nate
Tue, Jul 20, 2010 11:03am

I just recently watched the trailer for the first time, and I really don’t know where you’re getting this impression that Scott is a “Nice Guy(TM)”. To me he just seems like someone struggling with his own lack of self-confidence to ask a girl out, not much different from your average teen/young adult. There’s a difference between being passive-aggressive and just being shy.

Like other have said, I’m guessing the whole “evil” ex-boyfriend thing is just a video game construct and they’re probably not really evil. The U.S. trailer hinted at this with the “e-mail message” exchange.