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Jeune & Jolie (aka Young & Beautiful) movie review: who says virgin/whore must be a dichotomy?

Jeune and Jolie Young and Beautiful red light

Is she a virgin, or a whore? Surprise, she’s both! This French drama about a teenager is infuriating in its reductive stereotypes.
I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Is she a virgin, or a whore? Surprise, she’s both! The latest from French writer-director François Ozon (In the House) purports to be a female coming-of-age tale, but it’s yet one more example of a creepy old dude peeking in on a sexy teenaged girl and marveling at just how damn inscrutable women are, even as he makes no attempt whatsoever to try to figure her out as a human being. This year-in-the-life of Isabelle (Marine Vacth) marches through those precious seasons in a young woman’s blossoming when she discovers sex and instantly moves on to prostitution. You know, just like we all experienced, ladies, amirite? In summer, Isabelle turns 17 and has bland, unexciting first-time sex with a cute German boy while her family is vacationing at the beach; he gets off quickly, and she is entirely unmoved by the experience. Cut to autumn, and she is suddenly turning tricks as a call girl, getting old men to pay her for a hotel fuck… and now, she appears to enjoy neither the sex nor the money it brings her, unless maybe it means she can buy herself a fancy Prada handbag. Isabelle is almost a complete nonentity — we have no idea what she wants or why she does what she does — and while I suspect this is meant to be Gallic-ly elegant and “mysterious,” it’s just infuriating. As Isabelle’s year moves on to winter and then spring, it’s hard to see the film as anything other than a disgusting metaphor for women’s sexuality as something we do not enjoy for ourselves but only deploy against men… until we are appropriately chastised and punished for it, of course, and eventually must pass that “talent” on to younger women. There is no insight into female adolescence to be found here — the most Isabelle learns is “get the money upfront” — and the reductive stereotypes are offensive more for their banal, predictable tedium than anything else.


US/Canada release date: Apr 25 2014 | UK release date: Nov 29 2013

MPAA: not rated
BBFC: rated 18 (contains strong sex, nudity and very strong language)

viewed in 2D
viewed at a private screening with an audience of critics

IMDb
more reviews: Movie Review Query Engine | Rotten Tomatoes
  • Robert P

    we have no idea what she wants or why she does what she does

    This may piss you off but there doesn’t necessarily have to be a particularly deep “why” re: a young girl behaving this way beyond “because she feels like it”.

  • Allen W

    If you’re making a movie about it, there probably should be a “why” somewhere.

  • Robert P

    “Because she gets off on it” is a why.

  • Tonio Kruger

    Ah! Yet another cliche from the “Just Lucky, I Guess” school of philosophy.

  • David

    I’m not sure what the French version of the SAG card is but I’m pretty sure that all French actresses are required to shoot a sex scene in order to qualify. Preferably one in which they are looking bored or sad.

  • RogerBW

    Here’s a coming-of-age story that could be constructed from these incidents: young woman has unexciting sex, assumes that all sex is unexciting but gets into prostitution because it’s rebellious and pays moderately well, eventually discovers emotional connection too.

    And there’d probably still be plenty of nubile flesh for the audience to lech over.

  • Bluejay

    She DOESN’T get off on it! Did you miss the part of the review that says “she is entirely unmoved by the experience” and “she appears to enjoy neither the sex nor the money” and that the film portrays female sexuality “as something we do not enjoy for ourselves”?

    Or are you saying “Yeah, she gets off on it, MaryAnn just doesn’t want to see it”?

  • Robert P

    Ah, look what I just found. Watch this trailer – much is revealed. Yes, she gets off on it.

    http://youtu.be/dyrsmqmDEec

    Someone has also put the entire movie on Youtube.

  • Danielm80

    You’ve made quite a bit of effort to defend the movie. Maybe you should encourage people to pay money to see it, so the director makes a little money, rather than watch it for free online.

  • Bluejay

    And trailers, as we all know, always accurately represent the movie.

    If you want to actually watch the movie and then dispute MaryAnn’s review with actual scenes to back up your argument, be my guest.

  • Tonio Kruger

    Apparently projection isn’t just something they do in movie theatres.

  • bronxbee

    then that should be the “why” of the movie. but it seems from maryann’s review that they can’t even be bothered to give the main character’s point of view even from that hoary cliche.

  • RogerBW

    Quite so. That’s a story that the filmmakers could have told, that would at least have been focused on the woman, but I guess that would have been hard work or something.

  • Robert P

    And trailers, as we all know, always accurately represent the movie.

    I don’t suppose you bothered to actually watch the trailer?

    Verbatim quote:

    “I liked making the appointments…chatting on the internet….talking on the phone….then going….it was like a game…”

    She does it repeatedly. She likes it. This isn’t a runaway who’s desperate and hungry, not a burnout drug addict, she’s doing it for a thrill.

    You’ve made quite a bit of effort to defend the movie.

    No, I’m saying it’s very likely there doesn’t need to be some really deep, mysterious “why”. I’ve known girls who were very much like this. “Who she is as a human being” is a hormonal, teenage girl who’s about as deep as a cookie sheet, as teenage girls tend to be. She’s never paid an electric bill or a mortgage. She’s discovered this aspect of life and it fascinates her. It may irk the sensibilities of a diehard feminist but yes girls can feel a certain power trip seeing how they can effect men.

    Why is it a common battle parents have with their daughters to have them not dress like a streetwalker? Why do young girls go in droves to various bacchanalias and can’t wait to expose their bodies, get drunk, engage in irresponsible behavior of all nature? Because they get off on it.

  • Bluejay

    I don’t suppose you bothered to actually watch the trailer?

    I did. And I don’t accept trailers as firm evidence of specific events and motivations in the film, because trailers VERY often take scenes — even spoken bits of dialogue — and present them out of context. To take just a recent example, the trailer for Captain America: The Winter Soldier featured some dialogue by Robert Redford that made it seem like he was praising Cap for his contributions to history; in the film, Redford actually says this to the Winter Soldier.

    In this trailer, you don’t know who the girl is saying this to, or why she’s saying it. Is she lying? Is she just reciting what she thinks some psychiatrist wants to hear? Is she deceiving herself? Do her words match her actions and emotions elsewhere in the film? You can’t guarantee that you’ll get accurate context and character motivations from a trailer.

    You may or may not be right. But the only way you can credibly dispute the opinion of a critic who has seen the movie is to see it yourself. And if you do, take it up with MaryAnn, because I’m probably not going to see this.

    The rest of your comment is in response to Danielm80, so you should really reply to his comment directly. I’ll just say here that I’d be very interested to hear what commenters who were once teenage girls themselves think about your theories.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    Except she doesn’t.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    What characters say and how they behave can be two contradictory different things, and don’t always support each other.

    Here’s a hint: “I liked making the appointments” isn’t generally something people actually enjoy, and there’s no evidence that this is *actually* the case for Isabelle here.

  • Robert P

    ~shrug~ She says she enjoys aspects of it, she repeats the experience of her own volition. What would seem to be the most obvious conclusion?

  • Robert P

    I’m basing it on observations of and interactions with real-life females.

    Your alternate theory is…..?

  • LaSargenta

    Well, maybe there’s the rub. Above, Bluejay writes:

    I’ll just say here that I’d be very interested to hear what commenters who were once teenage girls themselves think about your theories.

    Maybe MAJ’s p.o.v. stems from that background and yours stems from having been male and only guessing what it might be like to be female.

  • Tonio Kruger

    What LaSargenta said.

    As for my own comments, they too are based on observations of and interactions with real-life women.

    Plus one of my best friends has a sister who used to be a member of the world’s oldest profession. (Not something she or I care to brag about, but it’s true.)

  • Robert P

    I don’t see anything specific that LaSargenta says regarding why the character in this movie might be doing it aside from – because she wants to.

    I’m going to go out on a limb and propose that all prostitutes don’t fit the same profile.

  • Danielm80

    If she says she enjoys it but appears listless and unengaged while she’s doing it, then either she has a different motivation or the filmmakers have failed to make her into a credible character.

  • Bluejay

    LaSargenta’s comment, and my comment that she quotes, aren’t about the specific character in the movie, which may or may not be poorly written. (By the way, have you seen the movie? I haven’t, and perhaps LaSargenta hasn’t, either. If that’s the case, then it seems ridiculous to me — as I’ve previously argued — to make claims about the character’s motivations based on a trailer.)

    What LaSargenta and Tonio Kruger and I are commenting on is the fact that you’re making VERY broad claims about the psychology of teenage girls (as well as assumptions about what irks “diehard feminists,” and some rather telling personal judgments about the kinds of clothes that some teen girls may want to wear). To quote you:

    “Who she is as a human being” is a hormonal, teenage girl who’s about as deep as a cookie sheet, as teenage girls tend to be. She’s never paid an electric bill or a mortgage. She’s discovered this aspect of life and it fascinates her. It may irk the sensibilities of a diehard feminist but yes girls can feel a certain power trip seeing how they can effect men. Why is it a common battle parents have with their daughters to have them not dress like a streetwalker? Why do young girls go in droves to various bacchanalias and can’t wait to expose their bodies, get drunk, engage in irresponsible behavior of all nature? Because they get off on it.

    I’d tell you what I personally think of your theories, but I don’t think this thread needs TWO men trying to mansplain what they assume is going on in the heads of teenage girls. I’d much rather hear people who used to be teenage girls speak for themselves. So when an intelligent critic with firsthand experience of being a teenage girl writes “There is no insight into female adolescence to be found here,” I’m much more strongly inclined to give weight to her view.

  • Bluejay

    And also:

    I’m going to go out on a limb and propose that all prostitutes don’t fit the same profile.

    Bravo! You’re absolutely correct. Would you care to extend this generous sentiment to teenage girls?

  • althea

    I know I’m a day late to this discussion, but i just wanted to sneak in a question: MaryAnn, is the quote in question actually in the movie? It isn’t uncommon for trailers to include things that don’t make it onto the screen.

  • LaSargenta

    Look, I really have no interest in explaining my anecdata about teenage females. All I want to say is (1) “deep as a cookie sheet” is funny and (2) totally incorrect about ANYONE, including teenage females. I’ve met individuals I’d describe thusly, but no single class of people.

  • LaSargenta

    I think you’re confusing “all teenage females” with “packs of teenage females who have been in my way”.

  • Robert P

    Hey, MAJ is discouraging people from watching it at all – lol

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    I can’t remember whether the quote is in the film or not.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    I don’t know where this, as quoted by Bluejay, comes from, since I don’t see it in this thread:

    She’s discovered this aspect of life and it fascinates her. It may irk the sensibilities of a diehard feminist but yes girls can feel a certain power trip seeing how they can effect men.

    But this bears no resemblance to the movie in question whatsoever. There is NO evidence that Isabelle is fascinated by anything. There is NO evidence that she’s enjoying a power trip.

    Have you actually seen the film, or are you just making up stuff about it?

  • LaSargenta
  • Bluejay

    The quote is from this comment, behind the “see more” button. (LaSargenta’s link is bad. :-) )

  • LaSargenta

    Whoops. That’s what I get for trying to do a cut and paste on an Android phone. Thanks.

  • Robert P

    I’ve probably interacted with more teenage females than most people – thousands. Tens of thousands. Yes, you definitely see commonalities and similarities in attitude, behavior, cognition, etc. Being not particularly deep as people isn’t an indictment, it’s pretty normal. They just don’t have input, experience, perspective.

    I don’t see it as at all implausible that a girl could end up doing what Isabelle does here. It’s not a matter of being in some desperate third-world circumstance, she finds this avenue and wants to explore it. A hallmark of teens in general is often not giving a lot of weight to or even having a particular awareness of potential negative consequences. They do something because they want to.

    Something that rings really true is that her parents don’t have the first clue what she’s been doing.

  • Danielm80

    Since I’m not a psychologist, or a teenage girl, I’m not going to make broad generalizations about what teenage girls are thinking.

    The world is a big place. There may be some teen girl somewhere who acts exactly the way you’ve described, for exactly the reasons you’ve suggested. But the specific girl in the movie still doesn’t come across as believable, and your explanation doesn’t match her behavior or her emotional reactions.

    If you want to see the movie and then give examples of scenes that MaryAnn has described incorrectly, go ahead. Unless you do that, you’re just speculating, and your speculation doesn’t make a lot of sense.

  • Robert P

    I thought it would be obvious that I’m making my comments having seen the movie.

  • Robert P

    Or at least my subsequent comments. I’ve seen nothing that gives me any reason to amend my initial assertion.

  • Danielm80

    Then you should be able to describe at least one scene in which the main character shows an emotional reaction to her work, rather than simply saying that she enjoys it.

  • LaSargenta

    Warning, possible ad hominem ahead, mostly due to your claim of deep knowledge of large swaths of teenage females:

    You claim such a level of immersion, I assume you are in education and probably high school ed. I’d also assume an all-female school. (Although, I assume, not math as “tens of thousands” is impossible unless you are both at a very large all-female school and very old. I did a quick search of parochial and private single-sex high schools in the US and Canada — didn’t see anything in your writing that indicates UK or ANZAC or Eng. as a 2nd Language — and couldn’t find one with a student body larger than 500.)

    If I had had the fortune to have you at my high school, judging by your commentary here, I think I would have classed you in with the teachers I felt contempt radiating off of. There were people there like that, the occasional teacher who was still bitter about not having gotten a named professorship or even a tenure-track assistant professorship. I got whatever learning they could provide and then mostly forgot them.

    Do you have such a low opinion of all teenage males, too?

  • LaSargenta

    PS: I might also propose that if, indeed, you have somehow interacted with “tens of thousands” of teenage females, there is no way on earth you can see them as individuals but only as members of some class(es) of abstractions.

    Yes, lots of people just fall into doing things — and, yes, teenagers don’t generally confide in their parents — but, there is always some motivation or at least context larger than “because I wanted to”. I (accidentally) crashed a motorbike, but how I came to be riding that motorbike was more than “I wanted to”. I always liked learning about and having control over mechanical things — whether it was by taking apart and putting back together the lock on the front door or the engine of my car. Plus, having a 1000 cc engine between one’s legs is pretty cool. Being a female and not riding pillion was not just rebellious to overprotective parents, but also to the biker dudes’ world. The guys I hung with were pretty damn rebellious themselves, so they respected that.

    To the outside, maybe all it looked like was some superficial trying-on of standard rebellion. But, no one operates in a vacuum. I haven’t made a study of fictional stories of teenagers who take up prostitution (I’ve known too many in real life who have done so, female AND male.) but, I would expect a film that provides some hint of emotional engagement (in any direction) and the protagonist’s interior context. Everyone has one.

  • LaSargenta

    Yeah, I’m sure you have. I just think you’ve watched it with some kind of filtered shades on that allow all your preconceptions to lock in your viewing experience. You expect her to be no deeper than a cookie sheet; the writer, director and actor all together can’t make her deeper than a cookie sheet; you don’t see anything wrong with that; ergo, it is an accurate story.

  • Robert P

    *Spoiler alert*

    The movie is full of her emotional reactions.

    How about when she’s going to town – and seems to be enjoying it – on one of her regulars who’s old enough to be her grandfather and he croaks and she flips out. She makes a fumbling attempt to perform CPR, then while running into the bathroom to get a towel to put water on it she slips and cuts her forehead.

    After she hurriedly dresses she pauses as she grabs the money, obviously feeling ambivalent about it, ultimately she does take the money and leaves.

    This is actually the event that brings her career to an end. The police track her down and they advise her mother that Isabelle has been living a double life and various sturm und drang ensues. When the police are interviewing her, she describes this particular man as having been tender. She obviously liked him.

    She’s upset when her mother wants to donate her money to a prostitute rehabilitation program – Isabelle feels she earned it, it’s hers.

    Her basic demeanor obviously changes – at first she’s timid, feels trepidation but eventually she’s going at it with gusto. She even uses something she learned while having sex with a boyfriend.

    Anyway, she keeps going back to it of her own volition.

  • Robert P

    It’s a modified version of what’s actually in the film. The quote in the film version is actually a bit longer. Same message.

  • Robert P

    PS: I might also propose that if, indeed, you have somehow interacted
    with “tens of thousands” of teenage females, there is no way on earth
    you can see them as individuals but only as members of some class(es) of
    abstractions.

    No way on Earth? You say this based on what? Yes, there is a way on Earth. I said what I said because it’s true. You do see similarities and commonalities among them. If it wasn’t true there wouldn’t be professionals whose specialty is dealing with problems and issues of kids of a particular age.

    Certainly not every girl is going to do something like this, but it’s not about every girl, it’s about this particular girl.

    Part of the equation is opportunity. A girl who looks like her is going to get hit on. She just is. In the film she gets started when some guy propositions her on the street and she eventually takes him up on it.

    Let’s look at the actress herself. Marine Vacth is a professional model and if you look online as with many models you’ll find numerous photos of her undressed, including in this movie. Not something every female would do but she’s approached to show off her body because she has a certain look and has what I believe most people would consider a great body – and she puts it on display…..for money. I’m sure a lot of people don’t see this as a big leap from prostitution.

    I think think MAJ’s issue with it is that it’s completely foreign to her internal wiring to do something like this and she has trouble relating to it.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    A girl who looks like her is going to get hit on. She just is.

    Oh my god. So, girls who get hit on naturally turn to prostitution? Jesus.

    I think think MAJ’s issue with it is that it’s completely foreign to her internal wiring to do something like this

    No, my problem is that the film makes no attempt AT ALL to even hint at what is going through her head about ANYTHING.

    and she has trouble relating to it.

    Look. I have no trouble relating to hobbits, ETs, robots, etc. In the context of a well-told story.

    This is not a well-told story.

  • Robert P

    Oh my god. So, girls who get hit on naturally turn to prostitution?

    No, it’s a catalyst that tripped a switch in this particular girl’s mind. The movie isn’t about every girl, it’s about this girl.

    No, my problem is that the film makes no attempt AT ALL to even hint at what is going through her head about ANYTHING.

    This goes back to my original point – you’re expecting some great flaming bush for a sign where there doesn’t have to be one.

    The notion of being a prostitute intrigues her so she goes down that path. The experience resonates with her, it just does.

  • Danielm80

    You can’t follow “The experience [of being a prostitute] resonates with her…” with “It just does.” Becoming a prostitute is not an ordinary life choice, and the psychology of someone who makes that decision needs to be explained in order for people in the audience to make sense of the story.

  • Robert P

    Becoming a prostitute is not an ordinary life choice

    Define “ordinary”. You may have heard it referred to it as “the world’s oldest profession”.

    You might find this interesting.

    http://newswire.uark.edu/articles/16181/affluent-educated-women-may-choose-sexual-prostitution

    the psychology of someone who makes that decision needs to be explained
    in order for people in the audience to make sense of the story.

    Name a particular food you like. Why do you like it?

  • Bluejay

    The movie isn’t about every girl, it’s about this girl.

    Well, at least this is an improvement over your previous comments, which claimed a lot of things about teenage girls in general.

  • Bluejay

    Name a particular food you like. Why do you like it?

    Really? You’re going to equate “I don’t know why I like chocolate ice cream, I just do” with “I don’t know why I like being a prostitute, I just do”?

    The link you provide is irrelevant. People from different backgrounds may have all sorts of motivations for going into prostitution. The point is, a well-told story will show those motivations.

    Your argument with MaryAnn seems to be that her bar for “showing motivation” is higher than yours. She wants the film to show what’s going on in the woman’s head, whereas you’re just willing to accept that, because the film shows her doing something, it must be because she wants to do it. Are you sure this isn’t just you being willing to read “motivation” into a character’s actions than the actor and the story are actually providing?

  • Danielm80

    If movie theatres start distributing that article to everyone who sees the movie, then the film might make more sense. Otherwise, audience members may wonder why this woman is risking social stigmas and legal complications when she has other, safer options.

  • Robert P

    Well, at least this is an improvement over your previous comments, which claimed a lot of things about teenage girls in general.

    They’re not mutually exclusive.

  • Bluejay

    Aren’t they? If the movie is about “this girl” and not about “every girl,” then you can’t use your suppositions about “every girl” to explain the motivations of “this girl.” When you say “teen girls tend to be shallow and get off on their sexual power over men,” you’re letting your assumptions (whether they’re right or not) do the work of making this character plausible to yourself, when really that’s work that the film should be doing. If a film lets the audience assume they know what a character is about, without providing sufficient evidence in the story itself, then it’s lazy and poorly written.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    it’s a catalyst that tripped a switch in this particular girl’s mind

    Can you offer even a tiny sliver of evidence from the film to support this?

    you’re expecting some great flaming bush

    Give me a little credit. I don’t need a “flaming bush.” A tiny ember would do it.

  • Robert P

    …it’s a catalyst that tripped a switch in this particular girl’s mind…

    Can you offer even a tiny sliver of evidence from the film to support this?

    I did. She specifically talks about how her involvement in prostitution began – this guy propositioned her on the street – the “it” I referred to – and eventually she took him up on it. She wasn’t doing prostitution previous to this event. This is what put the notion in her head – the catalyst that tripped a switch in her mind.

    …you’re expecting some great flaming bush…

    Give me a little credit. I don’t need a “flaming bush.” A tiny ember would do it.

    I saw the same movie you did – I’m telling you the explanation is there. She saw an avenue, a potentiality and pursued it. That’s as deep as it needs to be.

    It’s this “thing” she created, that’s all her own, that her parents don’t know about. She’s not looking for the romance of the century, she’s getting gratification out of other aspects of it. Yeah, she may come to regret it, later say “wth was I thinking?” She could run into a psycho and end up in a shallow grave in the woods – as the detective points out to her, but that isn’t factoring into her motivation of moment.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    She specifically talks about how her involvement in prostitution began – this guy propositioned her on the street

    So you *are* saying that it makes sense to you that getting propositioned naturally leads a girl to become a prostitute.

    Got it.

  • Robert P

    Any girl? No – you asked for a sliver of evidence from the movie that it was a catalyst that tripped a switch in this particular girl’s mind.

    Being propositioned for paid sex led this particular girl to become a prostitute.

    This article from 2003 describes a similar real-life example. While the article talks about girls who get into it for various reasons, they also talk about those – like Stacey – who aren’t in any way coerced into it. She was propositioned out of the blue one day.

    http://www.newsweek.com/could-be-your-kid-135949

    Her motivation? She wanted to buy stuff, and anticipated there might be some good sex in the bargain. I’ll betcha she’s not the first or the 1000th girl to do something similar.

  • Danielm80

    There are jobs that a person might reasonably take on the spur of the moment. If someone offered you the opportunity to become a wine taster or a disc jockey, you might think, “I’d be good at that, and I could use the money.”

    A prostitute is risking arrest, disease, bodily harm, and public humiliation. There are certain kinds of people who might take those risks: Someone who enjoys the thrill of danger. Someone who likes humiliation. Someone who’s too rash to think through the results of her actions. But each of people is–most likely–a different sort of person, so the movie needs to show us what kind of person she is, if we’re going to understand her motivations. Most people wouldn’t say, “Being a prostitute sounds like a fun, sensible job.”

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    Okay, I’m done. You seem to believe that it is not an unusual thing for a girl to shrug and decide to become a prostitute on a whim. I think it *is* an unusual thing and needs a bit more context when a character in a story does such a thing.

  • Robert P

    You seem to believe that it is not an unusual thing for a girl to shrug and decide to become a prostitute on a whim

    What I’m saying is that while it may not be something every girl does it isn’t a mystery that they would. They don’t have to have been raped by their uncle or forced into it by the Russian mafia or whatever. It can just as readily be some switch inside their particular consciousness that leads them to this.

    Ponder this – would you, even if you got into the best hardbody condition of your life, ever pose naked or topless for photos that you knew were going to be published nationally or internationally? While I could be wrong I’m guessing probably not, nor would a lot of women, yet there are those who have no problem doing that for money – such as most professional models. Though it’s not prostitution it’s still a matter of what one’s personal inhibitions are.

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    It can just as readily be some switch inside their particular consciousness that leads them to this.

    Whatever might happen in real life, this makes for hideously lazy storytelling.

  • corum12

    I think all of you are missing the point. It’s a film about life cycles and circles. There are so many hints of it that it is unbelievable you’ve all been missing them.
    Take the sexual experience theme. At first she is the virgin, then she is the prostitute and then she becomes the teacher – novice, expert, mentor.
    The old widow is actually a version of herself…that is why she disappears, like the young girl watching herself…it is a poetic and philosophic film and you may not connect to its themes but it is not about sex….

  • http://www.flickfilosopher.com/ MaryAnn Johanson

    So you’re saying that “prostitute” is a natural part of a young woman’s sexual maturation?